Has Indonesian Badminton Stagnated?

By Shubhi Rofiddinsa (Podcast Tepak Bulu)

After a disappointing semi-final exit against Japan in this years Sudirman Cup – losing 3-1 – many fans and experts heavily criticised the 20-player squad and questioned if they would ever repeat the win of 1989 and bring the cup home again. The fact that Indonesia hasn’t won any major team-tournament events since the 2002 Thomas Cup and 1996 Uber Cup makes the loss hurt a little more. Many regarded the Singles players contribution as disappointing as the team relied solely on doubles to rake up points.

Sudirman Cup 2019 team. Picture from Badminton Indonesia IG

The biggest question of them all is: has Indonesian badminton become stagnant recently? To answer that, let’s take a look at each disciplines’ progress so far this year before we set our eyes on the upcoming Indonesian Open 2019 in a few days.

Men’s Doubles

Who can Indonesian fans rely on to win games or tournaments? It’s always men’s doubles. The Minions – otherwise known as Marcus Fernaldi Gideon & Kevin Sanjaya Sukamuljo – are instantly recognised everywhere. They won all their matches in this year’s Sudirman Cup and their stature rises after each tournament.

The combination of attractive playing style and off-court demeanour add to the entertainment value of the game itself, making it more interesting to watch. Although the world number ones haven’t won as many titles as they did last year, their game is evolving: they are playing less explosively and being more patient in attack.

Photo from MFG’s Instagram

Meanwhile, Mohammad Ahsan/Hendra Setiawan are back on top again after their split in 2017 and have had a great first-half of the year so far: getting to four finals and winning two of them, All England and New Zealand Open .

Recovering from a game down Ahsan/Setiawan powered their way to the All England title.
Video courtesy BWF

Fajar Alfian/Muhammad Rian Ardianto is also a pair to watch this year winning the Swiss Open and silver at the Asian Games.


Women’s Doubles

Another discipline that can be counted on when it comes to consistent success in every tournament is Women’s Doubles. Nevertheless Greysia Polii/Apriyani Rahayu is the only Indonesian pair in the top 10 with no-one obvious waiting in the wings to join them there. They won all their matches in the Sudirman Cup until eventually succumbing to the Japanese powerhouse Mayu Matsumoto/Wakana Nagahara – the world number ones – in the semi final.

Polii will be 32 years old this year and questions have popped up about her successors. Names that have been mentioned are Ni Ketut Mahadewi Istarani, Rizki Amelia Pradipta, Della Destiara Harris, Agatha Imanuela and Siti Fadia Silva Ramadhanti. Indonesia’s head coach for women’s doubles, Eng Hian, said

“Maybe after the Olympic Games. 2021 maybe, finishing her contract with the sponsors first. After that, she might have thought about her next step (on what she wants to do). Be it a professional player or else”

This is a tricky area to regenerate. Finding a pair as successful as Polii/Rahayu, Polii/Maheswari or even Natsir/Marissa will be tough. It is the only sector that has not won an Olympic gold medal since Badminton’s inception in the games back in Barcelona 1992.


Mixed Doubles

The search continues for the ‘next’ Liliyana Natsir – one of the greatest of all time – after she retired from the badminton world earlier this year. Suprisingly, not many pairs from juniors are now competing at elite level. Although there has been good progress so far – by creating a competitive environment between the four main pairs – they always come up short in their finals.

Photo from BWF

Praveen Jordan/Melati Daeva Oktavianti have lost three finals so far this year: one in India, one in New Zealand, and another in Australia. The match that fans will always remember though is the semi final heartbreak at this year’s All England against the superior Zheng Siwei/Huang Yaqiong where they led 20-17 in the second set after winning the first one and ended up losing the match.

Meanwhile, Hafiz Faizal/Gloria Emmanuelle Widjaja haven’t been in top form. They lost their match against Denmark in the Sudirman Cup, they got to the final of the German Open but lost that too and are generally struggling to make much headway beyond quarter & semi finals. The newest pair – Tontowi Ahmad/Winny Oktavina Kandow have so far made good progress by contesting five quarter finals in six months. Ahmad is expected to be a good mentor for the 20-year-old youngster and the pair is fighting for the Olympic Games spot.

The 2017 World Junior Championship winners, Rinov Rivaldy/Pitha Haningtyas, seek to rise to the occasion as the elite pair for Indonesia in the coming years. Although they must be carefully observed and developed by their coaches if we want to see more of them in the future.


Men’s Singles

This is where it gets tricky because performances fluctuate. 2016 was the first time Indonesia could pin their hopes onto three youngsters to represent the nation.

Antony Sinisuka Ginting, Jonatan Christie and Ihsan Maulana Mustofa were in the Thomas Cup squad that year and the team finished runners-up after defeat by Denmark, the first European country to win the prestigious trophy. The first two players mentioned above have won three titles each and their form continues to improve with next year’s Olympics on the horizon. It seems that Ginting and Christie are the only players Indonesia can rely on to win titles but they often run up against the relentless Momota and don’t yet seem to have worked out how to beat him.

It’s going to be interesting to see how far Indonesia advances in the Thomas Cup next year.


Women’s Singles

No Superseries titles have been won by Indonesian women since its inception in 2009. Gregoria Mariska Tunjung and Fitriani frequently underachieve, although Fitriani did win the Thailand Masters back in January. It’s a realistic possibility that only one player will qualify for Tokyo 2020. Women’s Singles still has a lot of catching up to do to improve their competitiveness and succeed at the highest level. This is thrown into relief by the recent success of the South Korean player AN Se Young – if she has been coached to take on and beat the established top 20 players then why not the Indonesian women?

Re-live Fitriani’s maiden title in 2019 at Thailand Masters.
Video courtesy BWF

If this all seems rather folorn there is some positive news. With his success at producing great players like Nozomi Okuhara and Akane Yamaguchi, Reony Mainaky’s return home from Japan after his eight-year stint as a coach for their national team, will restore the public’s faith in the ambition of this team.


Conclusion

Men’s doubles will be the front-runner to grab the Gold medal in this year’s world championships in Basel, and also at the Olympics next year. Meanwhile other players performances can lack consistently good results.

In the end, Indonesia remains as one of the powerhouses in World Badminton; but languishing in the top five is not good enough for a nation with such a successful past and a fan base with the highest hopes. The stagnation can actually be seen from the over-dependency on certain disciplnes, especially doubles and this obviously hinders the ambition to win team championship titles.

Reony Mainaky’s return is a sign of intent but this is a mark of work in progress not ‘job done’. For these players to fulfil everyone’s expectations and realise their immense potential there needs to be a new approach that refuses to accept that what they are achieving on the world stage at the moment is the maximum possible rather it’s the start of something wonderful.


The author of this article – Shubhi Rofiddinsa – also broadcasts about badminton as the wonderful Podcast Tepak Bulu. Here’s a link to one of his episodes where he talks with Badminton Becky https://t.co/9YlAzrVhey?amp=1

You may also enjoy this piece about two of my favourite players: Polii & Rahayu https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/04/12/a-thriving-partnership-indonesias-polii-and-rahayu/

Marin is sorely missed

Since her devastating ACL injury back in January there has been something missing in badminton.

Some of Marins best points – video courtesy of BWF

In a WS world that has a lot of ‘retrievers’ here is an unashamed attacker. Marin rampages around the court – so fit and powerful – and demands victory. After winning a point, she shouts, she wheels away, a brisk walk with her back to her opponent, then onto the next serve. Constantly trying to build that unstoppable momentum that carries her forward.

Photo from Carolina Marin’s IG

The Spaniard is missed for a lot of reasons but I am highlighting her big on-court personality because I think it’s crucial to her psychological make-up and her future. Marin takes up a lot of space: she’s physically big of course – she can reach anything – but all the shouting and stomping around means her opponent has to work hard to zone her out. The noise can disrupt concentration and her rivals need to stay emotionally tranquil to get the upper hand.

That horrendous day when she injured her knee; we have all seen the slo-mo replay of the point in the game where she leapt, reached, hit, then crumpled. (I don’t want to post film of it here because it makes me feel so uncomfortable). It was evident it was bad. Over the following days things became clearer: serious damage, an operation, heavy duty rehab. Here is her reaction:

“It’s time to prepare for the most difficult battle, but I have no doubt that I will come back stronger”

Dio Uno from Carolina’s IG

She has come through tough tests before and has a record of facing up to challenges successfully. Let’s rewind a few years. In 2014 and 2015 she won the World Championship and then came Gold in Rio 2016. Spain has Rafa: he is the ace racketeer, but suddenly there was Carolina. Winning the Olympic title inevitably brought her to the attention of the non-badminton community and it is the pinnacle for most sports. After this she suffered a common problem for Gold medallists, to find a motivation to continue and to do this she had to look into herself.

What next after Olympic Gold? Well, her 3rd World Championship of course!

Her big challenge was to regain her enthusiasm for the game that she had devoted her life to. What else was there to win? There followed a period of reflection and it almost was like she was treading water, trying to get herself back to the player she was. She obviously has a great team around her and this includes a psychologist. Whatever it was they added, it worked: August 2018 she became World Champion for the third time and back to her best.

Highlights of the World Championship WS Final courtesy BWF

So what does the future hold? She seems to be targeting the World Championships in August in Basle. It would be amazing if she were back to her highest level so soon after an ACL rupture however, don’t bet against it. After being denied the pleasure of playing since January she must be hungry to get back on court to mix it with the top players. No need to worry about motivation, nevertheless an anxiety is going to be around rerupture and returning too early. We all want her back on court, raising noise levels and charging around so lets wait and see if she can reappear soon and return to her strutting best.

If you enjoyed reading this follow the link to my piece about the wonderful Ratchanok https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/06/26/ratchanok-can-thailands-sweetheart-get-gold/ and the new sensation AN Se Young https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/07/08/an-se-young-koreas-sensational-17-year-old/

AN Se Young: Korea’s Sensational 17 Year Old.

This young player has been under the spotlight since her Sudirman Cup triumph over world #1 Tai Tzu Ying.

Video courtesy BWF

She’s the spearhead of the new generation of players from Korea: other country’s fans look on jealously as her reputation grows after every tournament she competes in. Analysts and coaches have been enthusing about her potential for a while but it’s only recently that she has come to the attention of the wider badminton community. 2019 has been her breakout year.

First came the win against LI Xue Rui in the New Zealand Open Final. It was a ruthless operation that set down a marker to the rest of the players on the tour. Here was someone ranked at 89 in the world who could dispatch a far more experienced opponent in two games. Watch the highlights of the game below and you see a player who has speed, vision and touch.

Video courtesy BWF

Next came Korea’s Sudirman Cup campaign and that match against Tai Tzu Ying. Everyone knew that on paper TTY was going to win – except that is the Korean coaches – who planned the tactics for AN to implement

“My strategy was to defend in the beginning of each rally and then to take my opportunity…my coach advised me to pay attention to the front and keep the rally going”

Clearly part of the plan was to use AN’s youth and energy to keep the pressure on against Tai in the style that was so successful for CHEN Yufei in the All England Championships this year. It’s too simplistic to reduce the tactics to this though; especially as we all know how much time Tai spends in the gym. If you watch the BWF video at the start of this article you can spot how powerfully AN plays. Lightening reactions allied to some brutal mid-court kills show that merciless streak that every top player needs to win. In the post match interview Tai said

“She is tall, powerful and has very good footwork on the court”

Well, frankly, that isn’t telling us anything we didn’t know already, but in an oblique way it’s telling us a lot. Here is the player who no-one has quite worked out yet, someone with star quality and plenty of shots. Remember the following day? Ratchanok came along, she put up a great fight but the Thai player was just too much. There was mental strength and physical bravery but there was also a suggestion of a weakness on her deep backhand side that May didn’t hesitate to exploit.

And so we come to the recent Canadian Open: another opportunity to gain experience and Olympic qualification points. Again AN Se Young had a fairly low profile, again she progressed without much fuss, and again she won against decent opposition. She’s steadily climbing the rankings whilst getting to know how the superstars operate. We all have our views as to who will get Olympic Gold. Here is a player who has burst onto the scene, a tough rival but someone who isn’t quite the finished article. I think Tokyo2020 is going to arrive a little too early on her path to greatness but there are going to be plenty of other medals along the way.

If you like AN Se Young follow the link to my article about Ratchanok May https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/06/26/ratchanok-can-thailands-sweetheart-get-gold/ and also one about CHEN Yufei https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/04/03/another-sensational-player-from-china-chen-yu-fei/

I recently read an excellent article about AN Se Young on Everything Badminton – follow the link here https://everything-badminton.com/an-se-young-the-young-and-dangerous/

Featured

Tai Tzu Ying: Goddess or Mortal?

Tai Tzu Ying is one of the most adored athletes in the world whose appeal cuts across national boundaries. A once in a generation player who dazzles and inspires whenever she plays.

Is she the best ever women’s singles player? If we measure solely on medals at the moment the answer is ‘no’. So why is she so loved and why does it feel that she has no equal?

“She is the personification of joy” – from MinPlus

“She is the most delightful player to watch on court, she makes badminton fun” from September

“She’s our seratonin” – from GEL

She became World #1 in 2016 after a magnificent run of results and has stayed there ever since.

As a regular user of Instagram she often posts charming pictures of herself eating ice cream, playing with Lego or training in the gym with her team and this all helps to blur the boundaries between the elite athlete and her worshipping fans. She has commented that in matches, when she has been losing, it is the thought of letting down her supporters that has spurred her on to eventual victory. She does care about the fans who back her.

Tai Tzu Ying has a zen-like presence on court; when I first started watching her I was confused by her calm, smiling approach to victory or loss. Now I believe it’s very important to her to win – why else would she devote herself to the sport? But I also see someone who appreciates her life with her family and who has nothing to prove in her field. I think that she enjoys playing and is as thrilled as her spectators when she executes a great shot.

Video courtesy of Shuttle Flash

Her skill is breath-taking; take a look at the compilation video by Shuttle Flash. The quality of her trickery is amazing and so wonderful to watch in this era dominated by attritional players. The root of her genius is from her teens:

“…it’s said that her father took her to play on badminton courts at small clubs run by badminton lovers everywhere in Taiwan when she was a child. Wanting to win over these skilled (but informal) players she practised her deception skills and gained lots of success…” by eeye24

There is also the fact that she suffered a hand injury when she as 13. Because her metacarpal damage restricted her forehand play she had to rely more heavily on her backhand which gave her better wrist strength. As her father pointed out, the injury was a blessing in disguise. Her capacity for deception is extraordinary and she is a true artist with her racket. The variation in her game – the range of shots and angles -is staggering.

Picture from shutterstock

The flip side of such an adventurous player is that there is a trace of inconsistency which runs through her career. Sometimes in the middle of a game her focus just seems to drift and suddenly her opponent will put together a run of points. Often at this moment she manages to retune herself into the game, get her concentration back and finish off the contest but it doesn’t always happen. Watch the video below where she talks about this and the role of her deceptive moves.

Video courtesy BWF

She also mentions her stubbornness. In my earlier blog https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/03/18/tai-tzu-ying-taiwans-sporting-icon/ I talked about her courage and the fact that she is relentless in the pursuit of victory. She dares her foe to match her dazzling talent and I still consider the psychological warfare that she wages against her opponents a key factor in her success. The genius that she brings to her games is a delight for her audience (& her) but it saps her rival’s emotional energy. In my opinion the only other current player who approaches this level of skill is Ratchanok May.

So now we are in Olympic qualifying year and Tai Tzu Ying has hinted that she could retire after Tokyo2020. I think everyone wants her to win Gold; to cement her place in history and to bring her sublime skills to the attention of the non-badminton world. We are lucky to be able to watch such a wonderful player who lights up the court with her brilliance. Who knows what the future holds for her – it’s going to be fantastic to watch the next year of badminton unfold – and I hope that legends are made in the process.


TTY just taking it easy! From IG

If you enjoyed this post follow the link to my piece about Ratchanok – another of my favourite players https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/06/26/ratchanok-can-thailands-sweetheart-get-gold/ and also this article about AN Se Young: one of the most exciting players to emerge from Korea in recent years https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/07/08/an-se-young-koreas-sensational-17-year-old/