Yonex All England 2022: Men’s Preview

It is 2022 and all our favourites have returned to Birmingham to chase a place on the podium. There are unanswered questions from last year’s competition in both sectors and I am expecting to see plenty of athletes playing with a point to prove.

The Dads winning on 3 legs in 2019.
Credit: PATRICK ANTHONISZ/Alamy Live News

Men’s Doubles

The #1 seeds and crowd favourites will be trying to capture an elusive third title. Kevin Sukamuljo and Marcus Gideon create a thrilling aura of stardust together and must feel eager to get back on court to express themselves. Kevin’s brilliant inventiveness belongs on the grandest stages at the biggest moments. They should be wary of their first match as they haven’t played competitively since Bali. Originally they were listed in R1 to meet CHOI/SEO though it seems that the Korean’s may’ve withdrawn.

If the seedings unwind as expected, they will clash with the fifth seeds Rankireddy/Shetty in what should be fierce quarter final. I love the Indian’s willingness to attack but of course in a tie against the Minions they risk having their intensity turned against them. It will be fascinating to discover which pair prevails in an arena that traditionally offers slowish conditions.

The current World Champions Hoki/Kobayashi have seized their opportunities and really grown into their role as Japan’s top pair. Their control of the game under pressure, their bravery and shuttle placement will give them an advantage in Birmingham. As third seeds they could face Gideon/Sukamuljo in the semi-final which has the potential to be a Battle Royale.

At the opposite end of the draw the second seeds Hendra Setiawan and Mohammad Ahsan will be aiming to face their compatriots in the final. There are not enough superlatives in my thesaurus to describe these two. Their touch and teamwork are outstanding, but their badminton intelligence is what sets them apart from many of their rivals. The traps they set are subtle, their anticipation is exceptional and their hearts are big.

The strength in depth of the Indonesian MDs is astonishing. There are 6 pairs travelling to Birmingham. Alfian/Ardianto (seeded 6) will play Carnando/Marthin in R1 but whoever prevails in this tie has a tough route to finals weekend. The Malaysian team has brough 5 pairs: the most dangerous are the beaten finalists from a few years ago Aaron CHIA & SOH Wooi Yik. They won Bronze at the Tokyo Olympics and have made no secret of their desire for Gold in Paris 2024. They are a well balanced combination of speedy reflexes, athleticism and desire; they could be podium bound. GOH Sze Fei & Nur IZZUDDIN will be buzzing after their victory at the German Open but as unseeded players they have hard games lined up.

There are plenty of other pairs who could flourish. China always challenges hard; their players are so well-drilled in fundamental badminton skills that new ‘unknown’ combinations alway have the potential to prosper. The main Danish challenge will spring from the seventh seeds Astrup/Rasmussen, France has sent the Popov brothers, and the home audience will be hoping that Lane/Vendy can make things awkward in the top half of the draw.

Men’s Singles

Viktor Axelsen’s band of brothers – the athletes who have worked with him in Dubai away from their national setups – have been dominating men’s singles results recently. The Olympic Champion has been in the form of his life since the bold move to warm-weather training. Viktor has so many strengths but his competitive advantage stems from his emotional maturity. He has understood that the time is now. So, the question is: who can stop him winning back the title?

Anders Antonsen is seeded 3 and has to be aiming for the podium. He has an intriguing R1 tie against current World Champion and member of the Dubai Gang LOH Kean Yew.  If he gets past this hurdle, he may have to face Lakshya Sen another player who has enjoyed an improvement since training in Dubai. Next up, Lee Zii Jia in the SF for a chance against the King of Dubai himself: Viktor Axelsen There have been stamina issues in the past and I often catch myself wondering if he has hip problems when I look at his gait.  Behind all the messing around with peripherals like blogging he must be wondering what be achievable if he too was to start training in the gulf.

Another Dubai participant is the defending champion LEE Zii Jia. His challenge in Muelheim for that title fizzled out in the SF against Kunlavut Vitidsarn. The recent row with BAM about his professional status cannot have helped his preparation for Europe but he has to bring a more zesty attack to Birmingham. Anything less than a semi-final appearance will be a shock.

Kento Momota is seeded 2 but this does not tell the whole story of his circumstances. The car accident in Malaysia shifted his internal axis somehow .He has not regained his surgical precision or his focus. His is still an exceptionally talented player but he is beatable. Vittinghus must be looking at this match with a gleam in his eye. Momota can expect to be asked the tough questions every step of the way in Birmingham.

Aside from these players we have to look at the unseeded Lakshya Sen who has refocused and matured since working with Axelsen. In January he beat LOH Kean Yew to win the S500 India Open then, at the German Open, he stunned VA to get to the final. He had looked dead and buried at 15-19 down in the last set but his grit and tenacity are great weapons when they are blended with his reliable defence and willingness to rally. Thailand’s Kunlavut Vitidsarn was the eventual winner in Germany. Both of these players could disrupt a senior seed’s progress.

It didn’t look as though Jonathan Christie would be able to participate owing to his positive test last week. But he has travelled to the UK so perhaps he will be OK. As far as Anthony Ginting is concerned – because he is Jojo’s roommate – we are waiting to see the official confirmation if he is cleared to play or not. It will be a pity if he misses the chance to make a mark at the All England. In the past it has never seemed as though he has been able to impose himself on the tournament. It’s been a while since we’ve enjoyed a good MomoGi.

Conclusions?

The influence of Viktor Axelsen and his Dubai training camps has tilted the balance of power in Men’s Singles since the Olympics. That group of athletes will probably supply the eventual winner in Birmingham and that will give other players and coaches a lot to consider. Men’s Doubles is harder to call, although this may be an occasion for Kevin and Marcus to reassert their dominance of the title. Unfortunately, the situation is quite volatile regarding the impact of Covid upon athletes participation; it’s hard to imagine that these championships will avoid positive tests so let’s enjoy matches when we can and hope that everyone stays healthy.


If you enjoyed this take a look at my most recent article about Kevin and Marcus https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2022/03/05/kevin-marcus-at-the-all-england/


©2022 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Yonex All England 2022: Women’s Preview

A sparkling line-up in all the women’s sectors promises some brilliant battles ahead. The stars are back! The German Open has been full of upsets with some seeds struggling to impose themselves on the tournament. Let’s see if this unpredictable picture lingers into England.

Image courtesy of BWF

Women’s Singles

Three-time winner TAI Tzu Ying usually has a scintillating presence on court & brings stardust to any tournament; exceptional racket skills and unconventional genius means that she will be challenging for the title. However there are some big challenges ahead.  In 2021 Akane Yamaguchi hit a dazzling run of form.  Liberation from Olympic expectations unleashed a new focus, her fitness has returned, and she must be eyeing the trophy with confidence.  These two are seeded to meet in the final in a repeat of 2018. On that occasion TTY triumphed so Akane will want revenge. Neither of them were on good form in Germany; both crashing out in their R2 matches so they both must step up their play if they want the trophy.

China is consistently producing exceptional women players. It’s astonishing to realise that CHEN Yufei – the current Olympic champion – is only seeded #3. Of course she has not been able to participate fully in the tour owing to China’s Covid restrictions.  She is a deadly opponent who can drain the fight from a rival before putting them to the sword.  The bottom half of the draw is arguably able to offer her a smooth journey to the SF and a potential game versus Akane or Sindhu. Realistically her consistency and fitness make her favourite for this title. HE Bing Jiao is always a bit of an enigma.  During the pandemic she has become leaner, but has she become meaner?  I think we will probably find out if she makes it to a QF with her compatriot CHEN Yu Fei.  After beating Akane in Germany her confidence should be sky high. The other notable Chinese player bringing form to the UK is ZHANG Yi Man who dispatched Sindhu in three sets in Mulheim. She meets CYF in R1 so it’s a tough ask to expect progress.

As the defending champion Nozomi Okuhara has little to prove but has a harsh draw to negotiate.  She has remained quite low profile since Tokyo but in December – for the third year running – was crowned winner at the All Japan Badminton Championships. In the first couple of rounds she’ll have to overcome a double Danish challenge; in R1 round she is meeting Denmark’s Line Christophersen then R2 could offer Mia Blichfeldt. Further in, TAI Tzu Ying, May or AN Se Young await.  She will need to be on her game from the moment she steps onto court on day 1.

Is this going to be AN Se Young’s tournament?  The top half of this draw offers a lot of banana skins & she would probably have to overcome May, TTY or Nozomi to get to the final. This is my worry.  I’m a little unconvinced that her stamina will hold up through a bruising tournament – the cumulative effect of game after game after game does have a cost, so she must be tactically clever and try to conserve energy wherever possible.

Ratchanok Intanon was in good form at the Olympics; the battle with TTY in Tokyo was outstanding and there is a possible repeat of that epic match in prospect in the semi-final.  First May has to negotiate early rounds that include ASY.  Under pressure she often she executes extraordinary shots, disdains percentage play and can unravel a rival with her extravagant skill. I love to watch her compete like this but I think sometimes it’s the consequence of a desire to speedily finish off a rival; if they manage to hang in the game there can be Trouble.

The renowned Big Game Player – Pursala V Sindhu – is hard to analyse. She has an Olympic bronze from 2021 but often over the past 2 or 3 years she has struggled to build a winning momentum that takes her all the way to the top of the podium.  She wasn’t able to progress beyond R1 at the German Open in the run-up to this tournament so I’m not sure what we can expect. She is one of the best of her generation but Akane awaits in the QF.

I see CHEN Yufei as favourite for this title. However Akane enjoyed impressive form at the end of 2021; if anyone can beat her they are serious contenders.

Women’s Doubles

All the badminton community is anticipating the international return of FukuHiro with warmth in their hearts. They are such a likeable pair: their spirit against the odds at the Tokyo Olympics was admired the world over.  We have watched Yuki Fukushima joining forces with other players whilst Sayaka Hirota recuperated from knee surgery but now is an opportunity to see them attempt to recapture the title they won together in 2020. It’s hard to estimate where they are in terms of form and fitness. They will have to take one match at a time and see what happens. Nothing is impossible for two of the best players on the circuit.

The #1 seeds (and winners in 2019) can be a real handful for any opponent.  CHEN Qing Chen is a valiant, tireless player who screws down the pressure whilst left-handed JIA Yi Fan loves to smash or get a hard flat rally going.  They both have plenty of power and use it with venom. If it boils down to a brawl at the end of a game for the last few winning points then probably the Chinese pair will edge through. If they bring their A game to Birmingham, they will be unstoppable. 

It’s been a while since Korea won the WD title in Birmingham.  In fact, it was 2017 when LEE So-hee won it with CHANG Ye-na.  What a record LEE has of competing and winning at the highest levels in badminton over nearly a decade.  She is seeded 2 with SHIN Seung-chan and they kick off their campaign with a tricky tie against the Stoevas. KIM So-yeong and KONG Hee-yong are seeded 3 in the top half of the draw – both pairs have all the skills to get to finals weekend and once they are there anything can happen.

2021 was a break-out year for Nami Matsuyama and Chiharu Shida who upped their competitive levels and enjoyed plenty of success at the Indonesian Festival of Badminton.  Their creative aggression marks out the evolution of the Japanese house style.  I’m excited to see if they continue their development into the last stages of this competition.

I’m not neutral, I’ve followed and admired Greysia Polii for years.  That gold medal win at the Olympics was one of my happiest badminton days so I want to watch the 6th seeds go deep into this competition.  Although the GreyAp partnership remains in place for Birmingham it’s noteworthy that Apriyani Rahayu planned to be with a different partner at the German Open but unfortunately a minor injury scuppered that idea.  PBSI have to plan for the future but I hope the Olympic Champions play well in Birmingham, no injuries and do themselves justice.

The current champions Mayu Matsumoto and Wakana Nagahara who habitually win big events have been forced to withdraw because of a knee injury sustained during training.

This doubles competition does have the potential for a few upsets from unseeded pairs. Pearly TAN and Thinaah Muralitheran never know when they are beaten and their opponents are always in for a difficult hour or so on court. Likewise Maiken Fruergaard and Sara Thygesen can mix it with the best – in round one they face GreyAp and that’s a tricky challenge for the sixth seeds.

Mixed Doubles

I want to include XD in my women’s preview because I believe that it’s the performance of the woman in the duo that leads to victory .  The role of the woman partner has shifted over the last 15 years to a more proactive aggressive stance – I think mainly because of the influence of Liliyana Natsir, one of the true greats of the game. This benefits mobile players who are comfortable in attack and defence.

It’s quite hard to see beyond the first four seeds for the title. Deservedly at the top of the draw are the Thai pair Bass/Popor. They are physically strong, worked hard through 2021 and got plenty of success. They didn’t participate last year because of their focus on Olympic prep but 2022 will see them travelling to the UK with a strong chance of grabbing the trophy for Thailand. I think it’s significant that Sapsiree Taerattanachai is not competing in WD too. Her sole focus at this tournament will be XD. The two shutters who can stop them are the Tokyo Olympic Champions: WANG Yi Lyu & HUANG Dong Ping. I’m a big admirer of HUANG who is a wonderful doubles player with power, touch and plenty of smarts.  The destiny of the title is probably in her hands.

Who could challenge the favourites for the title?  Japan’s Yuta and Arisa are a formidable pair.  I love to watch them switch roles and see Yuta marauding at the net; this is a huge competitive advantage and very difficult to neutralise. The #2 seeds ZHENG Si Wei and HUANG Ya Qiong must also be eyeing the trophy but they have a very unconventional preparation for the tournament as they will be competing with different partners the week before in Germany.

Conclusions

So, a wonderful tournament hosting the best women players in the world lies ahead. The athletes who can stay fit and focused on their goals will be the ones who carry away the trophy on Finals Day. Every shot counts.


If you enjoyed this then take a look at my recent article about TAI Tzu Ying https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2022/03/02/tai-tzu-ying-at-the-all-england/


©2022 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Featured

Kevin & Marcus at the All England

From a partnership created in 2015 these 2 athletes have enthralled fans whenever they step on court. Kevin’s showmanship and exquisite racket skills are box office gold; Marcus is the bedrock of the duo. Rivals face unbearable intensity from over the net as the two Indonesian superstars wind up the pressure with split second finesse.

Indonesia’s Marcus Fernaldi Gideon and Kevin Sanjaya Sukamuljo celebrate victory in the men’s doubles final.
Photo via Alamy/Reuters / Andrew Boyers

They are two-time champions at the All England, but recent history means that there is a sense of unfinished business at this event. Supporters crave an exhilarating run to the final. Whatever happens in 2022 they have a legacy of dazzling battles in Birmingham: some of their most electrifying games have been played here.

2017 Semi-Final v Conrad-Petersen/Kolding

What a Thriller! From the moment the first shuttle was hit it was obvious that this was going to be a special match. There were traces of nerves, but all four players were driven to brilliance by each other. The European champions had the measure of the Minions in set 1; after some astonishing passages of play they closed it out 21-19. Set 2 – and the destiny of the final –  turned on Kevin’s flick serve when the scores were level at 12-12. The Danes were outraged, the Indonesians were inspired then won 10 points in a row, eventually levelling 21-13. Rubber…points were traded but it was deadlock up until 17-17 when Kevin and Marcus seized the lead and then refused to relinquish control.  Gideon’s match winner was a delicate disguised drop shot. 21-17.

2017 Final v v LI Junhui & LIU Yuchen

Fast & Furious! How much firepower would they have left after the previous night’s epic SF? The contest fizzed with passion and desire.  Set 1 was close –  just edged by the Indonesians – but Set 2 saw them hit another gear as Kevin went beyond the range of normal perception. His zest and speed of thought were phenomenal. Gideon’s magnificent play liberated Kevin. It was breathtaking as he executed shots that mere mortals cannot even dream of. It felt like non-stop attack; they both were tireless as they pushed for the title.  The Chinese duo tried to resist but in vain as the Minions were unstoppable.  Their first All England title was won in a whirlwind 35 minutes 21-19, 21-14

2018 Final v Mathias Boe/Carsten Mogensen

The defending champions came back to Birmingham on a spectacular run of form that continued through to the final. Kevin’s mercurial brilliance blended with Gideon’s tough, focused play meant that they limited the Danes to controllable flurries of resistance.  Even though Boe & Mogensen were competing hard and never out of touch on the scoreboard the result seemed inevitable.  Kevin’s superhuman anticipation for the winning point – a sharp net kill – epitomized the pair’s dominance of the court.  Title retained in straight sets: 21-18, 21-17.

Conclusion

The effervescent genius of Kevin & Marcus has consistently lit up the All England over the years. The tempo of their games, their athleticism and their desire to win this historic tournament always creates high hopes when they arrive in the UK. Once again they are top seeds and should be fighting for a third title by the end of the competition.


©2022 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Featured

TAI Tzu Ying at the All England

Is TAI Tzu Ying the greatest ever Women’s Singles champion at the All England? I think so. In 2020 a landmark third trophy was won, and this triumph proves her consistent dominance of the elite in an era of great players. Five years on from her first title in Birmingham she is still world #1 and seeded #1 for this year’s championship.

The Winning Moment 2020. Screenshot courtesy BWF TV

It’s enjoyable to curate happy memories so I want to revisit some of her best games in Birmingham. There is no doubt that when an outstanding opponent inspires her, she reaches levels of artistry that confound expectations.  When TTY is in the arena all eyes turn to her.

 I have chosen three of my must-see matches. It is fascinating to reflect that these games feature  exceptional opponents who all favour unique styles & TTY outplayed them all.

Final 2017 v Ratchanok Intanon

El Classico! Two incredible talents who spurred each other on to heights of excellence – a pattern we would see repeated in many other clashes between them down the years. The creative vision of both players, the pace of the game, the precision, and the desire to win were incredible. After losing the first set May played all out to level the match and was consistently in front . At 19-18 Ratchanok executed an outstanding combination of shots to outplay TTY and get to set point 20-18. Regardless of the peril she was in TTY replied with verve and focus; winning four points in a row to seal the Championship 21-16, 22-20. Brilliant badminton.

Final 2018 v Akane Yamaguchi

Epic Battle! The defending champion stepped onto court to face the #2 seed and what followed was one of the best Championship ties ever. Akane was aggressive and pacey, working hard to keep TAI Tzu Ying away from the net and was in position to close out the first set at 20-19. The shuttler from Taiwan answered with supreme racket skills, using wonderful touch to get variations in velocity and power. Again, she competed with no fear despite intense pressure from her Japanese rival. Of course, she used a reverse slice straight drop to gain the initiative and lead 21-20 then secured set one 22-20. The second set was more of the same. Absolute commitment and focus from the pair of players. Akane covered every millimeter of the court as TTY’s cross- court drives, sudden injections of pace and use of deception displayed her genius. Yamaguchi gave everything but could not neutralize Tzu Ying and she collected the All England title for the second year in a row. 22-20, 21-13. Breathtaking badminton.

Final 2020 v CHEN Yufei

Previous meetings with CYF had exposed TAI Tzu Ying’s tendency for self-sabotage. This time she was resilient. This was an encounter that revealed a great deal about her inner strength and ability to evolve. TTY turned one of CYF’s great assets – Patience – against her. It was a trump card. TTY was majestic: she stayed calm and focused her attacks with precision never allowing the Chinese player to escape the relentless pressure. 21-19, 21-15. There was an inevitability to this win; it was a career-defining victory.

Simply the Best!

No one flukes three titles at the All England. TAI Tzu Ying’s record in Birmingham reveals an authentic legend. I can’t wait to see her competing again soon.

“Courage means daring to do what you imagine”

Mike Krzyzewski

These three matches are easy to find on YouTube so treat yourself and settle down to watch some TTY magic. IF you enjoyed reading this then take a look at this article from my archives that celebrated her third title https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/03/23/tai-tzu-ying-the-triple-champion/


©2022 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved