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Team TAI Tzu Ying

TAI Tzu Ying is celebrated as a dazzling player: the best of her generation.  She is a sensational athlete who combines breath-taking technical skill with daring and panache.  She is applauded by millions of fans worldwide whenever she appears. However, when she wins a title her celebratory snapshot on Instagram always contains at least four more people.  This is her acknowledgement of the huge team effort behind her victories.  In this article I want to look at some of the people who help light TTY’s path to glory.

“The Team!”
Picture from TAI Tzu Ying’s Instagram post.

Coach LAI – Head Coach

“…all we can do is be better than before.”

Coach LAI in conversation with BWF TV

The badminton Gods were smiling on the day LAI Chien Cheng was assigned to work at TTY’s high school for his Substitute Military Service.  Over the years this chance meeting sparked a collaboration that has been a blessing for both. LAI had a good badminton background but made the decision to finish his sporting career when he was 21 preferring instead to put his energy into his post grad studies.  After connecting through her school badminton programme, at first, he was TTY’s sparring partner but his importance to her meant that his contribution expanded and in Feb 2015 he became her official coach.  By the end of 2016 she was world #1

LAI’s strength is that he understands what style to use to inspire TAI.  He is in a position of respect but he is on TTYs wavelength, so his emotional literacy enables him to get the most from his player.  She has commented in the past that other coaches have attempted to change her style but she ‘can’t’ play like that.  He recognises that there will be no reward in altering her game.

TTY’s impulsiveness and freedom to express badminton joy on court means that she uses shots that rivals can’t imagine.  LAI has said that he tries to focus on areas to improve and look for incremental gains.  At elite level small advances can make a huge difference and revitalise a player’s armoury.  LAI remarked recently that his biggest challenge has been to innovate in training – he was reluctant to copy other people’s methods because it would lead to stagnation. I have heard a similar observation from Fernando Rivas when he has spoken about his work with Carolina Marin. Both men understand that to achieve the extraordinary they have to be pioneers.

Crucially LAI says that he will often find more than one solution to a problem.  He has a genuine relationship with TTY that has a foundation in trust and honesty so the communication between them allows a focus on the process of training and this builds a winning attitude.

It was no big surprise in February 2019 to hear that LAI had been asked to become the head coach for the Taiwan badminton team for the Olympics – he was widely regarded as one of the brightest young coaches in the world at that point.  In the following six months TTY’s titles dried up.  He resigned from his role in October 2019 so that he could concentrate his attention back to her.

However, the relationship did not resume exactly as before.  The support team had been reinforced in Jan 2019 and this meant there were three more people to help fuel the search for excellence:

WAN Chia Hsin – Coach

We often see Coach WAN talking to TTY and holding the ice pack to her neck in the intervals in matches.  He competed internationally for Taiwan up to 2014 and now works in her team.  His responsiblity is to implement Coach Lai’s plans.  This is a vital part of the framework around TAI Tzu Ying.  He will provide precise assessments on areas for attention, and feedback to LAI to influence strategies. A second coach means that ideas and tactics can be analysed from new viewpoints.

Wang Shih-Ting – Physiotherapist

A large part of WANG’s role is to address aches and pains; I doubt that any elite athlete can avoid these niggles so the challenge is to manage discomfort effectively.  Like TTY’s physical trainer – FAN Zan-Yu – she is a graduate of Kaohsiung Medical University.  Her responsibility covers post-practice and post-match recovery.  Physios tend to use manual therapies like massage to manipulate the body.  This helps blood flow and relieves stiffness and we often see photos of this on Instagram as TAI Tzu Ying lies on a treatment table.  She will note injury patterns, plan rest and use this information to help fine tune training routines.

FAN Zan-Yu

FAN has been a great all-round athlete across many disciplines from swimming to frisbee but she’s mainly known as a basketball player.  Her duties are centred around maintaining fitness and running the pre-match warm up.  She works closely with the physio and ultimately her contribution will give TTY confidence that she has the stamina and agility to beat her rivals.  I think that there is an intriguing synergy between basketball and badminton.  Both need explosive power, high speed directional changes and 3D vision and both make huge demands on an athlete’s body.

Her Family

TTY has a loving and supportive family who are united in support of her.  When they were children, her parents took her and her sister along when they played badminton.  As she got older her father used to enter her in ‘open’ tournaments when she would compete against seniors – and lose!  She now credits this as a formative experience, one that taught her to accept defeat.  Her father is responsible for the idiosyncratic stringing pattern we see on her racket.  It’s revealing that she was treated with understanding by them when she wanted to give up training so she could have fun with her friends but they also supported her when she restarted. Her happy relationship with her Grandma is famous on Instagram. 

And PS…

Some fans have suggested that I add a little more about TTY’s father here. As well as being a caring and supportive dad he was pivotal in picking Coach LAI as a sparring partner in the first place so it was his shrewd judgement that initiated this fruitful alliance. Throughout her career he has been her manager; overseeing arrangements and ensuring she continues her journey in badminton in the best way possible.

Coach Lai and the team have worked in partnership to inspire and motivate her but they are only part of the story. She is adored by fans and has often commentated that she wants to win for them. Win or lose they offer unconditional support. It’s fascinating to consider how many people have walked along the path to excellence with TAI Tzu Ying.


If you enjoyed this take a look at another article of mine about The Queen https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/02/02/tai-tzu-ying-genius/


I’d like to thank everyone who helped with information for this piece including DeeTree (@tty4ever and taitzuyingfans.wordpress.com), Shodo0702 (@Sandrali13), eeye24 (@eeye24), Jenny Day, TTY’s Facebook admin and of course BWF TV.


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Featured

Michelle Li

by Michelle The

Michelle Li is the finest player in the Pan Am region ever; she sits in the top 10 world ranking with 4 Pan Am Games gold medals, 4 Pan Am Championships gold medals, and a Commonwealth Games gold medal in her pocket. However, that success didn’t come instantly. She has had her own struggles around lack of funding and solo travel while coping with injuries and playing with pain.  Badminton glory is something she has pursued since she was a little kid, even after disapproval from her closest people. There was one thing she knew for sure; she is very passionate about badminton and she wouldn’t give it up. She chose to follow her dream.

Embed from Getty Images

In her best days, Michelle Li is a pure delight to watch. Her beautiful shots and powerful smashes, paired with her tenacity, make for a great badminton match for spectators.  It’s obvious that she loves to play and enjoys being part of the sport.

Born in Hong Kong, Michelle Li moved to Canada at the age of six with her family. She picked up her first racket at age 11, playing with her mom at a local community center. Not long after, she started training at her current club, Lee’s Badminton. Even in the early days, her coach, Jennifer Lee saw her mental toughness and believed she could succeed.

In Canada, badminton does not get a lot of attention so she has to constantly deal with the lack of financial support. Even though she is a top 10 athlete, it is still a struggle for her to get sponsors. Badminton Canada tries their best to help but they just don’t have enough funding to fully support their athletes.

““Because badminton is such a small sport in Canada, sponsors aren’t interested in badminton. And if I go to Asia, they wouldn’t sponsor someone from Canada. They’d sponsor someone from their own country. So, it has always been a struggle financially to figure out how I’m gonna fund my next tournament,”

Michelle Li

In the past, she often had to travel on her own without a team in her corner.  Once in a while her coach could come along, but not always. Incredibly they would sometimes have to talk through WhatsApp to discuss tactics. Definitely not the ideal situation for an athlete mid-tournament.  More recently though, she has started working with a personal coach and a therapist from Taiwan who have been able to accompany her to competitions and that has helped her a lot. Covid has restricted this to some degree but she is usually with the Team Canada coaches and fellow players.

Like most elite athletes Michelle has had to overcome injuries. Leading up to the 2016 Olympics, she discovered that she had a tear in her patella tendon, right knee, and hip, along with a broken bone in her right foot. After Rio, she went through surgery and was forced to take significant time off from competing.  She underwent grueling hours of rehab just to make her whole right leg felt like hers again. She had to relearn the basics and crawl up the ranking board anew. It was a year that she described as being “really really tough”.

After the rehab things started to look bright again.  With strong determination Michelle Li trained hard and has kept improving ever since. She has won 2 Macau Open titles, and made it to the semifinals of some big tournaments beating tough opponents like Tai Tzu Ying and Nozomi Okuhara along the way. Her ‘A’ game is creative and hard-hitting.  So long as her focus isn’t diluted by worries about money or pain, she can go toe-to-toe with the world’s best and come away with a result.

With the Tokyo Olympics coming up, Michelle Li has a dream to stand on the podium.  Her motivation is to change the sport on her side of the world for the better. She believes a medal would really raise the profile of badminton in Canada and help her make that happen.  

Her story will encourage other aspiring juniors to defy odds, pursue their dreams, believe in what they can do, and become champions. She always felt that she wasted a lot of time just trying to figure things out alone, and she hopes her experience can help others speed up their own process. She wants to promote the sport and help people have a better chance of succeeding. Let’s wish her all the very best for the coming Olympics and for the rest of her career! Keep fighting, Michelle!

Screenshot from BWF TV

For more coverage of Michelle Li follow @michellethe22 on Twitter


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Featured

January 2021 Review: A Month In Thailand

Shock withdrawals, shock exits and shock reinstatements; January’s tournaments were never dull.  Unless of course, you happen to be a player quarantined in the Bangkok Novotel for 20 hours a day with chicken for dinner again.  Indomie products were suddenly currency and some athletes were  incentivised by the prospect of a year’s supply of the world’s best instant snack.

This is my look at the three Thailand tournaments.  I’m not pretending that I’m unbiased, or that I can cover everything but I hope my highlights remind you what a cracking few weeks fans have just enjoyed. 

HK Vittinghus’ January was epic.  Initially on the reserve list he had the ambition to gamble and start the long trip to Thailand from Denmark with no guarantee of a game.  Events moved in his favour when the Japanese team turned back at Tokyo airport following Momota’s positive test.  His story stuttered at the Yonex Thailand Open when he lost to compatriot Gemke in R1 but the following week saw him excel and become the focus of fierce support from fans in Indonesia who had realised that the further he progressed the more likely Anthony Ginting was to qualify for the World Tour Finals.  Some wild incentives involving Indomie noodles were offered.  Through very intense games he found a route to to the final and a match against Axelsen.  Along the way, his results meant that Anthony Ginting did qualify. Axelsen powered through the encounter but HK can be proud of his month’s work.

From BWF TV

Astonishingly there were triple champions in MD and XD and double champions in MS and WS which suggests that finding the winning formula fast in the impact arena offered big rewards.  I think that people with good underlying fitness combined with the resilience and drive to make the most of opportunities were at an advantage. Fatigue – mental and physical – was a factor for some as there was little breathing space between each tournament.

Men’s Singles

The Danish men controlled the courts all month – I’ve already mentioned Vittinghus but the fluctuations in the balance of power between Axelsen and Andersen is fascinating and I’m really looking forward to see who has the upper hand in March.  Andersen prevented his fellow Dane from a clean sweep of titles by some tactics at the World Tour Finals that some found controversial.  Not me.  I felt he was strategically very smart.  It’s unfair to reduce his astute strategy to his ‘easy’ concession of the second set.  Throughout the match he refused to give Viktor pace from smashes to feed off and this was a key element in his win.

There were times when we saw sublime standards from Anthony Ginting and I was disappointed that he didn’t get to a final.  His challenge is to stay with a game at the death. CHOU Tien Chen consistently made the semi-final of all three tournaments but somehow just lacked the resources to finish a match off.

Women’s Singles

Carolina Marin – like Viktor – completely dominated her sector in the first two tournaments; bulldozing TAI Tzu Ying aside as she triumphed in both of their finals .  At the season’s finale she was prevented from making it a hat trick by a tactically astute performance by TTY who finally managed to eliminate errors when it came to the crucial stage of the game.  This link will take you to my article that discusses TTY’s win in more detail https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/02/02/tai-tzu-ying-genius/

I’m often dazzled by Ratchanok Intanon to the extent that I don’t give enough attention to the other athletes in the Thai team.  Pornpawee Chochuwong can look back over her matches with a lot of satisfaction.  We saw her potential twelve months ago when she beat Marin in the final of the Spain Masters and it turns out that that was not a fluke. At the end of a hard month she was a semi-finalist at the World Tour Finals and posed a threat to every player.  AN Se Young also caught my eye: she got to three semi finals but couldn’t quite push through to a podium finish.

Mixed Doubles

A deserved hat-trick of titles for the home pair Dechapol Puavaranukroh & Sapsiree Taerattanachai (Bass/Popor).  They have been on the brink of good results for a while and this month they competed with gutsy resilience and strong self-belief.  They are a wonderful team with excellent mobility, stamina and racket skills. 

“This is my reward for nine months of hard work and dedication”

Sapsiree Taerattanachai courtesy BWF Media press office

This success could see them start to dominate their sector.

Women’s Doubles

I’ve always been a big fan of GreyAp and so I was beyond thrilled to watch their emotional win in the YTO.  Soon their journey together will end.  I’m delighted that they have used these tournaments to showcase their best style: Greysia smiling and Apri roaring on to victory. Well played girls!

Men’s Doubles

The Taiwanese duo – LEE Yang and WANG Chi-Lin – really enhanced their reputations throughout January.  Not only did they win all three competitions but their humble self-deprecating comments endeared them to watching fans.  Playing to their strengths they used power and muscle non-stop to overcome rivals.  They were too fast and furious even for Ahsan and Setiawan to tame and no-one beats the Dads by accident.  On the subject of the Dads; once again these two gnarly warriors battled through adversity and showed why they are admired worldwide. Here is my look at Ahsan’s gritty fight to stay in the game when he was struggling with an injury https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/20/mohammad-ahsan-player-of-the-day-total-legend/

Finally…Coach Kim, Happiness and Hope

The effervescent Coach Kim popped up in Thailand with the Korean team. Her energetic style radiates confidence and is irresistible. During the interval she seems able to outline any observations to her team in about ten frenetic cheerful seconds then she calmly sits down whilst the opposition coach remains standing.

It was an uplifting few weeks. Back to back tournaments undoubtedly stretched athletes but they still delivered some breathtaking matches full of skill. I think they gave supporters hope that there is a return to regular badminton just around the corner.


Here’s my recent article about Momota https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/12/27/momota-the-return-of-the-king/


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Featured

TAI Tzu Ying: Genius

Badminton’s Most Valuable Player

TAI Tzu Ying is the benchmark for all that is captivating about badminton.  Her triumph at this year’s World Tour Finals was a radiant festival of skill fused with courage.

Screenshot from BWF TV

Fans suffered through an intense game.  The score see-sawed as neither player was able to subdue the other.  Marin had dominated January’s tournaments in Bangkok: played 2 won 2.  At 15-10 up in the last set of this final she was starting to look unstoppable; she had the hat-trick within her grasp.

I hate matches like this.  I love matches like this. 

All through the battle TTY had a potent strategy: keep Carolina from dominating the forecourt and net area, keep her pinned back and persist with the difficult questions of her rear-court backhand.  It was the unforced errors that were jeopardising her challenge.  Marin’s noisy, boisterous approach, constant towel-downs and delays brought friction to the encounter.  I have never seen TAI Tzu Ying refuse an opponent’s request for a new shuttle before and she seemed irritated by some of her opponent’s attempts at psychological warfare.

When she stepped on court TTY knew that she had to stay patient and eliminate mistakes.  Once a rival hands the initiative to Marin she will lock in on victory, her velocity increases and she bulldozes her way to Gold.  Trailing 17-19 in the final set TAI roused herself for a final effort.  She pulled and pushed Marin around the court’s four corners and to draw level she produced an exquisite drop that was unplayable.  19-19.  She brought up match point with another dazzling drop.  Two points in a row and no errors.  The title was sealed by a shot that forced Marin to turn and retreat to the back line. Slightly off-balance she misjudged its trajectory and it fell in.  It was all over.  Victory to TAI Tzu Ying.

An arena with no spectators erupted with applause.  All around the world, fans who had been watching through their fingers could celebrate.

“Finally, I won. When I can remain calm and patient, I can win the game. In the end it was a tight game…before this match today I kept telling myself that I had to play patiently. In the previous matches, all my mistakes were caused my own impatience…I made some mistakes and that cost me against Marin because she is fast. I need to put a lot more effort to keep up with Marin’s pace.”

TAI Tzu Ying courtesy BWF Press Office

This win confirms her rise to legendary status.  Like Michael Jordan and Lionel Messi, she is an athlete whose skills transcend her sport.  Flair blended with ambition is a rare joy to witness and we are privileged to enjoy the genius of TAI Tzu Ying.


If you enjoyed this take a look at this article about TTY https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/10/03/we-miss-tai-tzu-ying/ or this one about the Taiwan mock Olympics https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/08/03/tai-tzu-ying-and-taiwans-mock-tokyo-olympics/


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

World Tour Finals 2020: Women’s Singles Preview

Matches played at electric pace with breathtaking skills – welcome to the World Tour Finals 2020! Plunge into the end of season event that showcases the best of badminton.

Women’s Singles is the most compelling sector in elite badminton. The variety of styles and intensity of competition adds up to a breathtaking spectacle.

The WTF begins with a round robin format. Once complete the top two athletes from each group embark on the knock-out phase: semi finals then final. The draw can have quite an influence as the woman who negotiates this phase whilst conserving energy is at an advantage later on. Tiredness is going to play a decisive role: these players have competed in two high level tournaments on the bounce, so those with speedy physical and mental recovery will progress.

Group A: Marin, AN, LI, and Kosetskaya

The irrepressible, extraordinary Carolina Marin is in a group she will want to rule!  Her loud hustly-bustly manner is only part of the story; this clever, committed player drives herself on to overcome challenge after challenge.  Carolina is an attacker who operates at pace; her vulnerability is revealed if her onslaught is faced and countered. Once she gets the opportunity to dominate the front court and use her spinning net shot her momentum is hard to resist so the key will be to see who can pin her back and be patient enough to frustrate her.

She was unstoppable in January: 2 tournaments played and 2 tournaments won.  So, who can halt her progress to this podium? Prediction: Silver

AN Se Young is the menace to the status quo who lurks just over the horizon.  She has been regarded as the player who could dominate the women’s game for years however, she hasn’t achieved that status yet.  Like Chochuwong she can earn great results but I think she still struggles to maintain consistent levels of excellence day after day at a tournament.  At the Toyota Thailand Open she couldn’t handle Marin’s pace and didn’t have a workable strategy to counter it.  She is still an incredibly talented competitor who may progress to the SF. Can she handle Marin this time?

Michelle Li is a nicely balanced player with great racket skills, the ability to play precision shots and read the game.  She has been the gold medallist at the Pan Am Games three times and yet I’ve heard it said that she performs better as the underdog.  I think sometimes her own inner voice sabotages her confidence and that can weaken her resilience.  She is very capable of getting to the semi finals so long as she takes advantage of every chance. That includes beating AN Se Young.

Evgeniya Kosetskaya is the first Russian singles to qualify for the WTF.  She’s not as well-known as some of the top seeds but she has honed her game in the Danish professional league so we can expect to watch a player who is hard to beat and tactically smart.  She could spring a surprise or two but it’s not likely that she will be able to build on an upset.

Group B: TAI, Intanon, Chochuwong and Sindhu

TAI Tzu Ying got to both finals in January but on each occasion she could not slow Marin down.  It feels wrong to complain about inconsistency but while her performances have been good enough to get on the podium she just has not been at her top level.  If she is going to disrupt the Carolina Marin show at the WTF she has to use everything at her disposal including the patience she used to win the All England. Prediction: Semi final at least but I’m concerned about her tiredness.

Ratchanok Intanon: as she got more court time in January, May’s play improved.  She was knocked out of the Yonex Thailand Open at the QF stages by An Se Young and at the Toyota Thailand Open she reached the SF.  Her campaign at the TTO showed off so many of her strengths and reminded us all what a dazzling player she is.  I think her quarter final against a resurgent SUNG Ji Hyun was superb: her gritty fightback after losing the first set was awesome.  Her semi-final battle with TAI Tzu Ying was dazzling with both players showing their creative power. Prediction: Too close to call, but I’d love to see her in the final.

Pornpawee Chochuwong is a young player who has taken some impressive scalps most noticeably her victory last year over Marin at the final of the Barcelona Spain Masters.  It’s unfortunate the disrupted 12 months has robbed her of the chance to build upon this; her assured net play and stout defence mean she could be capable of getting to the SF if she is ruthless in dispatching her rivals.

PV Sindhu – her game has been very up and down since she was crowned World Champion and it would seem that she is seeking to reset her approach.  I’m a big fan of the Rio silver medallist and I would love to see her cast her cares away and play without limits.  At core she is an exciting, intimidating player who can annihilate opponents without mercy.  Once she starts using her attacking clears and screwing down the pressure on rivals, she is so hard to resist.  Given her below par performances this month it’s difficult to predict glory in this tournament but I hope she can start to rebuild her game and use this as part of the process.

Any of these players can triumph in a one off match against the other but fatigue will blunt some challenges. Possessing the drive and resilience to go toe-to-toe with her peers day after day and dig out relentless wins is the crucial factor. January’s nonstop demands on our favourites are building to a crescendo. The athlete at the top of the podium on Sunday will be a worthy champion.


If you enjoyed this then take a look at my recent post about TAI Tzu Ying https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/10/03/we-miss-tai-tzu-ying/ or this one about Kento Momota https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/12/27/momota-the-return-of-the-king/


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Mohammad Ahsan: Player of the Day & Total Legend!

Today two brave warriors fought through the pain barrier together and probably seized a place at the World Tour Finals.

Screengrab from BWF TV

The iconic Dads are renowned worldwide for their match genius. The rock-ribbed duo will force a win when all hope seems lost. Remember the celebrated victory on three legs at the All England in 2019? This R1 win against Ellis & Langridge was on a par with that. Perhaps it was an even ‘better’ victory because we would all crawl to the arena to participate in a final but this was a game in the first round.

Shockingly the English pair raced to the first mid-game interval with an 11-2 lead. Morten spotted that Ahsan was in trouble with a leg injury. All was lost.

All was not lost. Slowly, slowly they dragged themselves back into the set. At 15-16 down there was a draining 79 shot rally and I feared for Ahsan as it progressed; but he was brave and scored the winning shot to level the score at 16-16. The set progressed to 21-21 and then somehow the Indonesian pair got two points and they were over the line. But could they continue?

As the second set progressd it became clear that the English players had lost focus. They didn’t exploit Ahsan’s lack of mobility enough. On the other side of the net the Dads drew on all their experience and tactical nous. Setiawan covered for his partner: they changed their tactics, kept the scoreboard ticking over and the rallies short. Into the interval leading 11-7. Two fighters refusing to concede. Incredibly they kept going. Calmly dealing with everything the English pair could throw at them they sealed the second set and so the match 21-15.

I named Ahsan as my player of the day but I could easily have said “Setiawan” because together these two become more than mere athletes. They are lionhearts who proved once again why they are legends. Bravo! This was an absolute priviledge to watch!


If you enjoyed this then take a look at my article about Apriyani Rahayu https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/16/apriyani-rahayu-semi-finals-player-of-the-day/


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Apriyani Rahayu: Semi Finals Player of the Day

Apriyani Rahayu propelled GreyAp into the final of the Yonex Thailand Open with a sparky display backed up by her stalwart partner Greysia Polii.

This match had all the makings of a doubles war of attrition but a complicating factor was the effect of drift in the Impact Arena and ultimately this was exploited more intelligently by the Indonesian pair. Set 1 was taken by LEE/SHIN 21-15; they started smartly and executed some brilliant net interceptions. Polii pulled back (a little) into uber defence.

The second set started better. Apri was quick and powerful: her aggression plus the slight advantage of the drift began to tell in the scoreline. The commentator Podcast Tepak Bulu likened her performance to that of Keigo Sonoda and I think that’s a very clever observation. Her energy and bravery were exceptional throughout. It was a must-win set and they nailed it 21-15. Game On!

Apri’s combatitiveness and Greysia’s composure really paid off. They went into the interval just ahead at 11-9: there had been one sequence in the early exchanges when the commentary team spotted that Polii had played 12 drops in a row, all beautifully accomplished, all diffusing the pressure that the Korean team were trying to exert. The grit and determination of the Indonesian duo broke the Korean’s resolve. The score continued to tick up in favour of GreyAp; both LEE and SHIN had shoelace fiddling episodes in an attempt to disrupt the momentum of their rivals. They tried to prolong the rallies as well but mistakes began to creep into their play.

Match point was brought up by sharp work at the net by Greysia. In an ironic twist – given Polii’s iffy serve all through the game – Apri planted a low accurate serve over the net. It was left by the Koreans but proved in by Hawkeye. Victory. Well done both, ice packs on and lots of luck for a good game in the final.


If you enjoyed this then take a look at my indepth article about GreyAp https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/01/19/greysap-redux-polii-rahayu-are-back/


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Player of the Day R1: Saina Nehwal

First, a confession – I didn’t watch the match today between Saina and Selvaduray Kisona. However, I want to award my ‘Player of the Day’ accolade to the Indian player because the last 24 hours must really have tested her resolve to get out on court and compete, let alone win.

Screenshot from BWF tv

The shocking news yesterday that two Indian players had tested positive for Covid made headlines worldwide. Her millions of fans were dismayed at the news that one of them was Saina and that her opponent had been awarded a walkover.

What a difference 24 hours has made. Gossip started leaking out that she had been retested and was now confirmed ‘negative’. Would she be allowed to reenter the competition? Was she OK?

She is a player who has a steely core; we’ve seen this throughout her career. Late yesterday when we got the news that she’d been reinstated it was also revealed that she had been stuck at the hospital for 10 hours. Today, in the last game of the session, having been shifted onto Ct 3 at short notice she won in two sets 21-15, 21-15.

I can’t report that her fitness is back to its best, or that niggling injuries are healed. But I’m thrilled to tell you that there can be no questions about the mental resilience and grit of this athlete. Congratulations Saina!

Honourable mentions today go to Daren LIEW who shocked Anders Antonsen by dumping him out of the tournament in two sets and Ratchanok Intanon who looked sharp and fit in her victory over YEO.


if you enjoyed this then take a look at my indepth article about Saina here https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/10/08/indias-saina-nehwal-trailblazer-legend/ or my preview of this competition here https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/07/badminton-reloaded-yonex-thailand-open-singles-preview/


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Player of the Day R1: Fajar Alfian

FajRi were asked some tough questions by the Thai pair Phuangphuapet & Viriyangkura this morning and were on the brink of crashing out of the competition in Round 1.

Screenshot from BWF TV

It was Alfian who clawed them out of a hole when it was starting to look like they might suffer a shock exit. Typically they are a dazzling attacking duo but the slow hall conditions blunted their pacey style and the Thais were resolute in their challenge. Ardianto had a so-so game: his range was a bit off which meant some of his shots did not land. Fajar stepped up and dragged his partner to the finish line with brilliant attacking variations and a positive attitude. At the crunch, match point down Ardianto held his nerve to execute a superb cross-court shot that set up Fajar‘s net kill. He followed this up with 3 flick serves in a row to settle the final game 22-20.

“It was a tough match because our opponents played well. We haven’t faced them before, this is a new combination. We have played Nipitphon but we’ve not played Tanupat, and he played very well today, so we took time to get used to the style”

Muhammad Rian Ardianto quote courtesy BWF Press Office

An honourable mention also goes to Dane Mia Blichfeldt who – in the shock of the day – dispatched P V Sindhu over 3 sets and also Ashwini Ponnappa whose leadership in her XD pairing with Rankireddy took the duo to a deserved victory over the sixth seeds Faizal/Widjaja.


If you enjoyed this then take a look at my previews for the Yonex Thailand Open https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/07/badminton-reloaded-pt-2-yonex-thailand-open-doubles-preview/ and https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/07/badminton-reloaded-yonex-thailand-open-singles-preview/


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

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Badminton Reloaded Pt 2: Yonex Thailand Open – Doubles Preview.

Doubles highlights everything that’s brilliant about badminton. The tempo, teamwork and tactics all combine to create an electrifying show.

The Yonex Thailand Open will be our first opportunity to watch most of these pairs since March. The impact of local Covid protocols will have caused training disruption and periods when it was impossible for partners to practice together. Some athletes will have spent the last 10 months enriching their skills whilst others will have stagnated. Now there is a fresh start for everyone and I’m impatient to see who has used this time wisely.

Women’s Doubles

We have been used to the domination of the Japanese & Chinese pairs in this discipline recently so their absence is an opportunity for the other seeds – predominantly Korean and Indonesian competitors – to make a mark. Three Korean pairs are seeded: Kim/Kong (4), Lee/Shin (3) plus Chang/Kim (6) . Kim/Kong will bring a bit more to the party in terms of aggression and imaginative badminton. I wonder if the success of the Korean competitors will be determined by the performance of Apriyani Rahayu. If she can dominate the play and build off the rock-solid foundation that Greysia Polii always provides then Greyap could get to the final. The other twosome to catch the eye are the Danes: Sara Thygesen and Maiken Fruergaard. They could go far if they clear the early rounds and get into their competitive rhythm; they were outstanding at this years Indonesia Masters.

This is a link to my piece about Rahayu being the best player in the SF https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/16/apriyani-rahayu-semi-finals-player-of-the-day/

Mixed Doubles

This promises to be an exhilarating event. The #1 seeds and home favourites Puavaranukroh and Taerattanachai (that is, Bass/Popor) have a fabulous opportunity for a podium finish. Blistering speed, great technique, accuracy and aggressive style mean that they are a handful for any rival, but they are still ‘work in progress’. They were beaten in this years final of the All England over three sets by #2 seeds, Praveen Jordan and Melati Daeva Oktavianti and the prospect of a return match is a tantalising thought. When Jordan is focused and fit his ferocious smashes and cunning play form the bedrock of a formidable team; Melati’s pace and anticipation make them hard to dominate. So who could get in the way of these two pairs? Marcus Ellis and Lauren Smith are England’s best chance of a podium spot in the whole tournament. Ellis knows how to win tough games; his mental and physical resilience are superb and Smith is just getting better and better. They lost to PraMel in the All England semi final this year and would relish the chance of revenge.

Men’s Doubles

Kevin’s positive test and subsequent quarantine at home in Indonesia was a disappointment, likewise the no-show Japanese and Chinese pairs. Nevertheless, because standards are so high in this sector it is not a catastrophe for the quality of the tournament.

The brilliance and depth of talent in Indonesian badminton means that there are still 2 seeded pairs with every chance of making the final on Saturday an all-Indonesia affair. The legendary Daddies – Mohammad Ahsan and Hendra Setiawan – are superb competitors with impecable standards. Setiawan’s technical ability combined with his proactive, intelligent play means that they have the resources to claw their way to victory even when they are under the most severe pressure. Their apparently nonchalent attitude on court disguises an unshakeable winning mentality. I’m a little nervous of the Indian duo Rankireddy/Shetty who they will probably play in R2. They are young, energetic and improving all the time so this is potentially a game where the Dads need to be ready to douse any fireworks that are thrown their way. Fajar Alfian and Muhammad Rian Ardianto who are the second Indonesian seeded pair (#5) must be eyeing the podium. The English pair Marcus Ellis and Chris Langridge are unseeded but could be battling them for a place in the Semi-final.

The top half of the draw opened up with the withdrawal of the Minions. The Malaysian 8th seeds Aaron Chia and Wooi Yik Soh have emphasized in recent interviews how hard they have been training during the long lay off and that they have focused on strengthening their defensive game. This could be their chance to step up and win a major tournament. The dangermen in their way will be the Russians Ivanov/Sozonov.

After such a long break these competitions will be won by the duos with the most ambition – the trophies are there for the taking. The athletes who have been able to adapt to the covid protocols in Bangkok fast without letting it disrupt focus will enjoy a huge advantage. Thailand is the heart of badminton for January with three tournaments in a row within a safety bubble: finally, after some very hard months we can say ‘Badminton is BACK!’


Part 1 of my preview is here https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/07/badminton-reloaded-yonex-thailand-open-singles-preview/ and here is a link to an article I wrote about two of my favourite doubles players https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/01/19/greysap-redux-polii-rahayu-are-back/


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved