Kento Momota

Momota has been the dominant force in Men’s Singles all through 2019, his consistency and strength are second to none.  It’s no surprise then, that after such an electrifying twelve months, his position as World #1 is very firmly fixed. King Kento triumphed over Viktor Axelson in the course of 3 dramatic games at the 2019 Yonex All England Championships and in doing so became the first Japanese man to win the title. His outstanding year earned him a total of 11 titles; it’s extraordinary to reflect that he has played in 73 matches and only lost 6.   It’s hard to pinpoint who will challenge this relentless excellence anytime soon.

Screenshot from BWF TV

The key to the left-hander’s success is his domination of the net and the forecourt which allows him to control the progress of the duel.  He is so fit he dictates the tempo of the contest.  He is brilliant at game management because he is strategically quick witted – this allows anticipation to be a significant part of his armoury.  If he misjudges his opponent’s tactics, he is electric around the court; his fast feet and lovely balance allow him to reach any area. This translates into further pressure for his opponent as they search for undefended space.  As we would expect from an elite player, technically he is very accomplished with powerful and precise shots. The knack of swiftly spinning defence into attack rushes his rivals and means he can gain more time for himself.

His superb all-round game is underpinned by his athleticism.  Lean and tall, his muscle to weight ratio gives him the perfect physique for badminton.  It’s well known that he completes additional work in the gym long after his hitting partners have showered and returned home.  A day off is a distraction from the training regime he is immersed in. He is driving himself to find that extra percentage point of fitness that can make the difference between triumph and defeat at the top level of sport.  Winning a singles match over three games can become a war of attrition; perpetual movement is all.  We have all seen collapses from cramp as players push themselves into their red zone.  Once an opponent starts to falter physically Momota will ruthlessly force the issue and gain an inevitable win.

It’s been said that he can sometimes sit back and be too passive, it’s true that he can be patient but when the time is right, he explodes into action and will seize the match. Choosing shots to keep a rival off balance – even a simple sequence to move them around the corners – means that sooner or later the opportunity will open up to win the rally; it doesn’t seem to matter to the left-hander if the rally lasts 30,40, or 50 shots, inevitably his opponent ends up running further, becoming tired and making a mistake.  He knows that opponents’ errors cost will them the match; being patient is – paradoxically – a sharp sword in his strategic make up.  He often does not need to use his full repertoire; through a competition he can perform within himself and get a good result.

Playing against Momota is like becoming trapped in a maze; whichever tactics are employed they seem to lead to the dead end of defeat.   He is impenetrable.  Alone on the court with no partner to protect him he has to be emotionally self-reliant and confident in his own decisions.  Defensively he can soak up pressure endlessly without using up too much energy.  Victory in men’s singles often rests upon stamina, mental strength, and the sparing use of explosive power to punish mistakes.

Right now, he is getting further and further out of the reach of his rivals.  His opponent at the Yonex All England 2019 final – Viktor Axelsen – has subsequently had an injury disrupted year and is only just starting to compete again at a good level.  The Dane is famous for his 400 kph smash but this isn’t enough against Momota.  In fact, the energy used for a smash can often contribute to defeat.  CHOU Tien Chen, the world #2, has endurance and mental fortitude to equal him and will always ask tough questions in a match. The adorable SHI Yuqui – the 2018 YAE champion – has also suffered from injury problems, but if he was fully fit it is arguable that he would be the player to upset the World #1. In their Sudirman Cup match this year it was Momota who succumbed to accuracy, relentless athleticism and an unmatchable will to win. 

The two best players in men’s singles at the moment: Momota & Ginting.
Screenshot from BWF TV

I think his most interesting rival is Anthony Ginting despite what the world rankings say.  Ginting’s sparkling style, his inventiveness, courage and speed push Momota to new heights.  They inspire each other but it seems that this inspiration feeds the Japanese’s ambition and leaves Anthony unrewarded. 

At the moment he is unstoppable.  Over the years his career has taken a lot of twists and turns – including an enforced absence from Rio 2016 – but now it feels as though his time for greatness is approaching.  His desire for success, his realisation that the Tokyo Olympics offers the chance of immortality, and possibly a need to make up for his mistakes in the past all give an irresistible vitality to his performances on court.  The devastating effect that C-19 has had on the world means that all athletes are enduring a career hiatus. I’m confident that Momota has the mental strength to endure this delay. 2020 was the year his fans regarded with the highest expectations – so now we wait a little longer. Will 2021 be the year that Kento Momota cements his place amongst the legends of the game?


Here’s my recent article about Momota’s trickiest rival https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/11/25/anthony-sinisuka-ginting/

Here are links to blogs about other members of the Japanese team https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/11/06/japans-fukuhiro-can-they-win-tokyo-gold/ there is also this one about Akane https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/08/09/japans-akane-yamaguchi-hotter-than-july/ and this about Nozomi https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/04/23/nozomi-okuhara-racket-ready-for-tokyo-glory/

This is a version of an article I originally wrote for the Yonex All England website https://www.allenglandbadminton.com/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

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