Yonex All England 2022: Men’s Preview

It is 2022 and all our favourites have returned to Birmingham to chase a place on the podium. There are unanswered questions from last year’s competition in both sectors and I am expecting to see plenty of athletes playing with a point to prove.

The Dads winning on 3 legs in 2019.
Credit: PATRICK ANTHONISZ/Alamy Live News

Men’s Doubles

The #1 seeds and crowd favourites will be trying to capture an elusive third title. Kevin Sukamuljo and Marcus Gideon create a thrilling aura of stardust together and must feel eager to get back on court to express themselves. Kevin’s brilliant inventiveness belongs on the grandest stages at the biggest moments. They should be wary of their first match as they haven’t played competitively since Bali. Originally they were listed in R1 to meet CHOI/SEO though it seems that the Korean’s may’ve withdrawn.

If the seedings unwind as expected, they will clash with the fifth seeds Rankireddy/Shetty in what should be fierce quarter final. I love the Indian’s willingness to attack but of course in a tie against the Minions they risk having their intensity turned against them. It will be fascinating to discover which pair prevails in an arena that traditionally offers slowish conditions.

The current World Champions Hoki/Kobayashi have seized their opportunities and really grown into their role as Japan’s top pair. Their control of the game under pressure, their bravery and shuttle placement will give them an advantage in Birmingham. As third seeds they could face Gideon/Sukamuljo in the semi-final which has the potential to be a Battle Royale.

At the opposite end of the draw the second seeds Hendra Setiawan and Mohammad Ahsan will be aiming to face their compatriots in the final. There are not enough superlatives in my thesaurus to describe these two. Their touch and teamwork are outstanding, but their badminton intelligence is what sets them apart from many of their rivals. The traps they set are subtle, their anticipation is exceptional and their hearts are big.

The strength in depth of the Indonesian MDs is astonishing. There are 6 pairs travelling to Birmingham. Alfian/Ardianto (seeded 6) will play Carnando/Marthin in R1 but whoever prevails in this tie has a tough route to finals weekend. The Malaysian team has brough 5 pairs: the most dangerous are the beaten finalists from a few years ago Aaron CHIA & SOH Wooi Yik. They won Bronze at the Tokyo Olympics and have made no secret of their desire for Gold in Paris 2024. They are a well balanced combination of speedy reflexes, athleticism and desire; they could be podium bound. GOH Sze Fei & Nur IZZUDDIN will be buzzing after their victory at the German Open but as unseeded players they have hard games lined up.

There are plenty of other pairs who could flourish. China always challenges hard; their players are so well-drilled in fundamental badminton skills that new ‘unknown’ combinations alway have the potential to prosper. The main Danish challenge will spring from the seventh seeds Astrup/Rasmussen, France has sent the Popov brothers, and the home audience will be hoping that Lane/Vendy can make things awkward in the top half of the draw.

Men’s Singles

Viktor Axelsen’s band of brothers – the athletes who have worked with him in Dubai away from their national setups – have been dominating men’s singles results recently. The Olympic Champion has been in the form of his life since the bold move to warm-weather training. Viktor has so many strengths but his competitive advantage stems from his emotional maturity. He has understood that the time is now. So, the question is: who can stop him winning back the title?

Anders Antonsen is seeded 3 and has to be aiming for the podium. He has an intriguing R1 tie against current World Champion and member of the Dubai Gang LOH Kean Yew.  If he gets past this hurdle, he may have to face Lakshya Sen another player who has enjoyed an improvement since training in Dubai. Next up, Lee Zii Jia in the SF for a chance against the King of Dubai himself: Viktor Axelsen There have been stamina issues in the past and I often catch myself wondering if he has hip problems when I look at his gait.  Behind all the messing around with peripherals like blogging he must be wondering what be achievable if he too was to start training in the gulf.

Another Dubai participant is the defending champion LEE Zii Jia. His challenge in Muelheim for that title fizzled out in the SF against Kunlavut Vitidsarn. The recent row with BAM about his professional status cannot have helped his preparation for Europe but he has to bring a more zesty attack to Birmingham. Anything less than a semi-final appearance will be a shock.

Kento Momota is seeded 2 but this does not tell the whole story of his circumstances. The car accident in Malaysia shifted his internal axis somehow .He has not regained his surgical precision or his focus. His is still an exceptionally talented player but he is beatable. Vittinghus must be looking at this match with a gleam in his eye. Momota can expect to be asked the tough questions every step of the way in Birmingham.

Aside from these players we have to look at the unseeded Lakshya Sen who has refocused and matured since working with Axelsen. In January he beat LOH Kean Yew to win the S500 India Open then, at the German Open, he stunned VA to get to the final. He had looked dead and buried at 15-19 down in the last set but his grit and tenacity are great weapons when they are blended with his reliable defence and willingness to rally. Thailand’s Kunlavut Vitidsarn was the eventual winner in Germany. Both of these players could disrupt a senior seed’s progress.

It didn’t look as though Jonathan Christie would be able to participate owing to his positive test last week. But he has travelled to the UK so perhaps he will be OK. As far as Anthony Ginting is concerned – because he is Jojo’s roommate – we are waiting to see the official confirmation if he is cleared to play or not. It will be a pity if he misses the chance to make a mark at the All England. In the past it has never seemed as though he has been able to impose himself on the tournament. It’s been a while since we’ve enjoyed a good MomoGi.

Conclusions?

The influence of Viktor Axelsen and his Dubai training camps has tilted the balance of power in Men’s Singles since the Olympics. That group of athletes will probably supply the eventual winner in Birmingham and that will give other players and coaches a lot to consider. Men’s Doubles is harder to call, although this may be an occasion for Kevin and Marcus to reassert their dominance of the title. Unfortunately, the situation is quite volatile regarding the impact of Covid upon athletes participation; it’s hard to imagine that these championships will avoid positive tests so let’s enjoy matches when we can and hope that everyone stays healthy.


If you enjoyed this take a look at my most recent article about Kevin and Marcus https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2022/03/05/kevin-marcus-at-the-all-england/


©2022 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Featured

Pearly Tan & Thinaah Muralitharan

2021 has been a breakout year for this young and exciting Malaysian pair. Their dynamism and tenacity have won them plenty of new fans over the past twelve months because they have been seriously challenging players ahead of them in the rankings

At the Indonesia Masters. Screengrab courtesy BWF

When they were at junior level, they were not WD partners unlike many of their current rivals. They have competitive familiarity across the sectors but the main factor significant to their current style of play is the influence of XD as the pair have both got experience in this discipline. Their bold approach to matches is refreshing and I sense that there is a shift happening away from the more traditional, old fashioned neutral play towards tactics that allow players to take the initiative in a match.

Their performance in the first round at the Toyota Thailand Open was an “aha moment” for fans and analysts.  It was an exhilarating contest packed full of drama.  After losing the first set they levelled then refused to concede the third.  It was simply gripping.  They were down 18-20, saved four match points and eventually won 27-25.  It was an 87 minute white knuckle ride where they kept their focus and eventually earned victory.   

As a pair they are keen to disrupt their rivals rhythms with intelligent use of angled shots.  Thinaah has a strong front court game and both can unleash some power. Naturally they are good defenders but it’s the intensity and pace of their attack that enables them to seize command with flat drives and effectively screw down on their opponents.

Their first world tour title win at the 2021 Swiss Open  was  confirmation that they are on the right track.  A straight set victory over the quintessence of defensive WD –  the Stoeva sisters –  felt like a  shot of adrenaline to the heart of the discipline.  It was proof that the partnership has raised their game over the past couple of years.

These two athletes are possible stars of the future and are part of the generational shift following Tokyo 2020.  They still have a lot of hard work to do if they want to move up to the consistent standards set in Women’s Doubles by the Japanese pairs.  It was revealing that in their recent Indonesian Master’s game against Matsuyama/Shida they were carried along by the momentum of the Japanese attack without really being able to derail it and they were beaten in two sets.  They must have more tactical options if Plan A is not successful.

“You’ll see us fail, I guarantee it.  But you will never see us quit”

Thinaah Muralitharan on her Instagram

It’s exciting to watch a pair with a fresh approach. They are ‘work in progress’ but they have the potential to keep moving up the rankings and can aim to be top 10 players. Their spirit and gritty resolve mean that they can frighten any opponent so they can regard the future with hope and optimism. I can’t wait to see how they meet the challenges of the next couple of years.


©2022 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved