Yonex All England 2020 pt 2

Doubles: The Bonfire of My Anxieties

Doubles is intense, it is the supreme embodiment of badminton. Fierce battles rage across the court; pace, power and guile form the contours of the match. The finest tournament in the world has an extra pressure this time around because it is Olympic year: many still strive to win enough ranking points to compete in Tokyo. This is great news for fans who love drama and stress but if you need a quiet life…look away now!

“Two people until the end, do not regret” Matsutomo

Indonesia

The magnificent MD athletes from Indonesia simply shine on every stage. Intensity, resilience and desire add up to some wonderful players.

The 2019 title holders – Mohammad Ahsan & Hendra Setiawan – famously won on 3 legs last year after an all-consuming final. I love them. They are outstanding players and incredible ambassadors for the sport. They have every chance of playing in the final so long as they carefully manage their old legs.

Gideon & Sukamuljo are top seeds and have a heavy weight of expectation loaded on their shoulders. At their best, with Marcus as reliable foundation and Kevin riffing around him they are simply unbeatable. Gorgeous shots, dazzling reactions and relentless athleticism raise the sport to heights few others can aspire to.

Fajar Alfian & Muhammad Rian Ardianto are seeded 5 and got to the Semi Final last year. Their high energy explosive game puts them firmly in the ‘fast ‘n’ furious’ camp; they should still be in the competiton by finals weekend.

If we consider WD then Greysia Polii & Apri Rahayu have had a great start to 2020 and if they play in the same way that took them to victory at the Indonesia Masters they will get to the semi-finals. I think they are more successful when Apri is decisive at the forecourt. I’ve mentioned before that their game and competitive strategy is evolving. Her power and confidence means they can really dominate rallies – they shouldn’t resort to defensive clears as a default tactic. I think they were fortunate to win the Spanish Masters because there were times when their gameplan slipped back to the 2019 version of themselves. The other Indonesian pair, Ramadhanti & Sugiarto, are in the same part of the draw as Greyap.

Greysap on their way to victory at the Indonesian Masters. Screenshot BWF

Japan

Park Joo-Bong – the legendary head coach – has overseen Japanese players challenge the traditional Chinese dominance in all sectors. This often means that their biggest rivals are each other.

As far as WD is concerned we are in the heart-rending position of knowing that only 2 out of the 3 top pairs from Japan are going to qualify to play in their home Olympics. The quest for points overshadows tournaments and I think the risk is that the four players who make the cut will be mentally exhausted by the time July arrives. That said, a win at the All England could virtually cement some players positions. Matsumoto & Nagahara are seeded 2 and were runners-up in 2019. Fukushima & Hirota are third seeds and are desperate to progress. And so we come to Matsutomo & Takahashi who are seeded 7 in Birmingham. Can the defending Olympic Champions get a podium finish? They need to focus every atom of experience and desire because they have a hard road to the final which includes a possible CHEN/JIA QF followed by compatriots who need success too. This is another pair who need to look after old legs.

The two main MD pairs Sonoda/Kamura and Endo/Watanabe are consistently excellent players who have to compete in a sector stuffed with Indonesian brilliance. I particularly like the fast and furious style of Sonoda/Kamura but that’s not enough to beat Marcus and Kevin. It’s possible either pair could get to a SF and then anything could happen, particularly if they can be more unpredictable with the pace they attack at.

Keigo Sonoda from BWF TV

China

Some say that China is not the dominant force it’s been in the past yet Chinese athletes are defending 3 titles at the All England this year. The strength is in the women’s sector; for now, the men are being eclipsed by the depth of other nation’s squads.

#1 Seeds and WD defending Champions CHEN Qingchen & JIA Yifan are aggressive, tough players. They are great at ratcheting up the pressure on their opponents: they can zero in on a victim with pitiless ferocity by using hard flat drives and fast smashes. Who can stop them winning? DU Yue & LI YinHui are seeded 6th but it’s hard to see them getting as far as the weekend.

There’s only one seeded pair in the MD: LI Junhui & LIU Yuchen – China used to be such a powerhouse but now the talented players in Indonesia and Japan dominate the rankings. Li & Liu are clever athletes; they can play a power game but they are also capable of varying the tempo and this can cause frustration for players like Sukamuljo. It can be a very smart tactic to break up the flow of the game against the Minions. It’s been pointed out that if Li/Liu run out of ideas they resort to a monotonous smashing game; that isn’t going to work in the big arena. Realistically I think they are going to struggle to get beyond QF.

Korea?

Korea’s WD players are experiencing a similar headache to their Japanese counterparts. As things stand there are still 4 pairs who could qualify for Tokyo. In Birmingham Lee So-Hee/Shin Seung-chang and Kim So-yeong/Kong Hee-yong are seeded 5 and 6 and look to be most likely to challenge. The drama over the past few weeks has been around the MD/XD player Seo Seung-jae who was suspended then not suspended by his national association (BKA) following confusion around sponsorship deals he had signed. It seemed disproportionate to punish his partners and destroy their hopes for this year so I’m glad he’s back in the mix.

Realistically I think we can only say that the WD teams have an outside chance of medals owing to the strength of the opposition. However, it’s interesting to observe that Korean badminton coaches enjoy plenty of success working away from home. I’ve already mentioned Park Joo-Bong and Japan, there is also Kang Kyung-jin who works with the Chinese squad plus Coach Kim who worked in India with PV Sindhu in the period she became World Champion.

Conclusions

China, Japan and Indonesia look set to see off opposition from the other nations for the doubles crowns. I adore following doubles; the tactics, tempo and talent mean that for fans the spectacle is second-to-none. The spine-tingling experience of watching the spotlit pairs as they play for glory at the All England is a joy. Ahsan & Setiawan had a fantastic 2019 and it would be wonderful to see them defend their title. As the tournament progresses, the tension will rise, legs will tire and towards the end it’s mental strength and an athletes appetite for the fight that gets them to the podium. May the best team win!


My preview of the WS part of the tournament is here https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/03/03/yonex-all-england-2020-pt1/

If you enjoyed this then take a look at my article about Polii and Rahayu https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/01/19/greysap-redux-polii-rahayu-are-back/ and this one about Kevin & Marcus https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/11/29/the-minions-indonesian-superheroes/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Yonex All England 2020 pt1

Women’s Singles

Welcome to the greatest badminton tournament in the world. This is the one that all elite players want to win and the one that fans from around the world long to attend. A dislocated build-up to this tournament will undoubtedly have tested players focus. All of us have fretted about the coronavirus and the postponement of the German Open will have disrupted the training plans of some.

Winning this tournament is never a fluke; years have been spent training for these games. All those drills, the weights, the sweat have all been leading to the moment when the competitors walk onto the court in Birmingham and begin.

We are in the Golden Age of women’s badminton. This is the zesty sector, full of talent and excitement, the top 20 players is a corps of excellence drawn from around the world. CHEN Yufei is the current holder of the title and there are 3 other ex-champions TAI Tzu Ying, Carolina Marin and Nozomi Okuhara taking part as well.

Badminton immortality beckons – who will answer the call?

TAI Tzu Ying – Seeded 2 – Champion in 2017 & 2018

At the core of TTY is the desire to sparkle not to merely play. No-one has the technical mastery she brings to the court; the breathtaking shots she executes are simply magnificent. Her vision and creative energy elevates her game to a level of brilliance that we expect of a genuine great of the game. Her achilles heel is her lack of consistency: sometimetime her focus can wander, I think she can sometimes be bored into losing a game. Her participation in the PBL in January was a clever way to undertake a segment of training; it allowed her to hit with new partners, get match practice and enjoy herself. It’s been pointed out that perhaps playing games only up to 15 points may help her concentration – well, we’ll see! Rumours that she plans to retire after the Tokyo Olympics are adding an extra sense of desire from fans who just want to see the QUEEN win everything. Prediction Final

From BWF TV
Nozomi Okuhara – Seeded 4 – Champion in 2016

Nozomi’s 2019 synchronised hope and despair – her fans watched so many finals that ended with Silver. She knows what it takes to win in Birmingham and possibly the hall conditions will help but she has to be the boss a bit more frequently. I want to see her snap up points. Patience is such a cornerstone of her tactics but to be effective it must be used alongside impatience, unpredictability and aggression. Sometimes we see flashes of a more attacking player and if she could get this part of her strategy right it would make the difference between winning and coming second. There are no easy games at Super 1000 level but she has the ability to get right to the final.

CHEN Yufei – Seeded 1 – Champion 2019

The defending champion has enjoyed an excellent win streak since her victory last March. After the All England she appeared in six finals and was unbeaten. Despite her status as top seed she has a very difficult route to finals weekend. In R1 she faces Korean Wonderkid AN Se Young, R2 will be Busanan or Blichfeldt and QF could be Ratchanok. She is an even more resilient player than last year; she has high fitness levels, great patience and solid technique. It’s her patience in games that proves to be such a key weapon. Opponents have to be very sure of their own stamina to equal her, she will often soak up pressure throughout the match before ambushing her rival in the last few points. Prediction Quarter Final.

Ratchanok Intanon – Seeded 5 – Runner Up 2017

Ratchanok often employs a ‘do or die’ approach and I adore her for that. A wonderful win at Istora in the Indonesia Masters final against Marin over 3 sets settled my nerves about her resilience so I think she has an outside chance here. A possible QF against CHEN Yufei awaits; she must not let CYF bore her into losing the match! Prediction Semi Final, Go May!

Saina Nehwal – Unseeded – Runner Up 2015

Desperately seeking points to secure her fourth (yes, fourth) Olympic spot Saina has a dangerous R1 clash with Akane to begin. To have any chance of progressing she must start well; to her credit since her QF exit at the Spanish Masters she has been training in Denmark. She identified her movement on court as one of the reasons for underperformance last year and it’s true she has often lacked fluency. If she has addressed this weakness then her shrewd gameplay will have a solid foundation. She is a tenacious fighter and even if Akane dispatches her I still don’t think her Olympic hopes are finished. Prediction: it’s not over

AN Se Young – Unseeded

The dynamic, dangerous prospect from Korea could pose some serious questions to CHEN Yufei in R1. This tie could go either way; CYF should have enough resilience and experience to get over the line but I’m not certain of this result. In the past ASY seems to falter as the cumulative efect of hard games pile up. I think this is only because she is young, soon it will not be a problem. She could beat CYF but I don’t think she’ll win the title.

P V Sindhu – Seeded 6 – Rio Olympics 2016 Silver Medal

Sindhu’s underwhelming performances since her magnificent triumph at the World Championships in Basle have often been explained by the phrase ‘big tournament player’. Her motivation – if that is the problem – should not be an issue here. Like TTY she also particiated in the PBL so it will be interesting to see if the different vibes around playing for the franchise team had a positive effect. At her best she will annihilate her opponent with a savage exhibition of pressure badminton, at her worst she can crash out in R1. Beiwen Zhang is her first challenger and that is a match that could go either way.

Akane Yamaguchi – Seeded 3 – Runner Up 2018

I hope that Akane’s triumph at the Thailand Masters means that the fitness issues that have been dragging her down since last August are conquered. That final was against AN Se Young who just seemed to run out of ideas. More importantly though, Akane did not run out of legs. BirdJapan has such a colossal few months coming up it’s vital that she regains the form she had back in July 2019. I think her performance in this competition will be the first indication of what we can expect at the Uber Cup and then at the Olympics. Prediction: Semi

Carolina Marin – Seeded 8 – Champion 2015 & Rio Olympics 2016 Gold Medal.

After a ghastly 2019 dominated by her ACL rupture and rehab Caro has returned to competition and is back on court. Noisiness is part of the strategy, she likes to dominate the space physically and aurally, it contributes to unsettling her opponents. She has not won a title this year yet and I was shocked that she lost the Spain Masters to Pornpawee Chochuwong. This was a well-worked victory, Marin’s ability to deal with a gruelling three set match was questioned and Chochuwong exploited cross-court opportunities really effectively. Prediction QF.

Conclusions

Women’s Singles is choc-a-bloc with talent; the quality of the unseeded players competing here means that upsets and shocks are inevitable. The Yonex All England is a critical showcase for athletes in Olympic year and success here could mean participation in Tokyo is guaranteed. I’m not neutral, I hope the Women’s Singles title is won by the player who is adored around the world and whose style sums up the joy that is fundamental to her game. If this is TAI Tzu Ying’s last championship then I would love to see her on the podium. There have been distractions and anxieties but now is the time to focus on sport.


Follow this link for part 2 of my preview covering doubles https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/03/06/yonex-all-england-2020-pt-2/

If you enjoyed this preview take a look at my blog about TAI Tzu Ying https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/12/16/tai-tzu-ying-the-queen/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Barcelona Spain Masters: WS Preview

After the excitement of the PBL and the Team Championships the tour arrives in Europe for the next few months

We are counting down to the end of the Olympic qualifying period. The situation for players who have already confirmed their spot – such as Marcus & Kevin – is excellent. They can manage their preparations to peak in July; no need to risk injury or burn-out. However, athletes who are hovering in the borderlands, those who are in the position of being ranked between about 10-25, are going to get drawn into an increasingly fraught scrabble for points. Some will be anxiously looking over their shoulders whilst others know that they can get to Japan, with a huge effort plus a bit of luck.

Because of the tragic situation in China and elsewhere regarding Covid-19 the travel restrictions have had an impact upon some players attendance. I believe the Chinese team are going to have a European base for a while to help with their quarantine compliance. Unfortunately this will not be in time for this Spanish tournament so there have been some significant withdrawals. Well, it’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good; the competitors who can make Spain must make the most of the circumstances they are in.

Women’s Singles – WARNING! THIS IS ALL ABOUT SAINA

Carolina Marin must be looking at the other players in her home tournament in much the same way that a lion views antelope drinking at a water hole. Prediction: Winner!

Screenshot BWF TV

Her die-hard supporters are still focusing all their positivity around Saina Nehwal‘s push to qualify for the Olympics again. If she can, it would be a magnificent acheivement. If she fails, then armchair fans can easily identify areas that should have/could have been managed differently. It’s a lack of consistency that has frustrated her ambitions over the last 12 months. She has had persistant injuries and has commented that her problems on court stem more from an inability to move smoothly rather than any lack of desire. There also seems to be a lack of clarity around her coaching support. As an experienced elite player she surely is the best judge of who she needs courtside but I feel lukewarm about the idea of her husband providing this help. Tactical advice should come from an expert. It’s undeniable that she has fallen prey to distractions away from the game too: Vogue covers and political ambition may refresh a jaded player or they may dissipate focus.

Embed from Getty Images

At a minimum she must get to the semi-final but Line Kjaersfeldt awaits in R2. She has already beaten the Indian this year at the Thailand Open and, during the Indonesian Masters back in January, she shocked CHEN YuFei in the second round in straight sets so Saina must be awake from the minute she gets on court. Kjaersfeldt could easily play the sort of strategy that exploits Saina’s lack of fluency. The key question is: Can Saina’s cunning carry her through? If she can play the sort of game that saw her win against AN Se Young in Malaysia then the answer is YES! Prediction: Semi

XXXX STOP PRESS XXXX DANES WITHDRAW XXXX

After their wonderful victory in the European Women’s Team Championships on 16.2.20 some key Danish players have withdrawn from the tournament citing injuries. Unfortunately Mia Blichfeldt (originally seeded 2), and Line Kjaersfeldt will be missing from the Women’s singles. Saina MUST take advantage of this to accrue Olympic points; she will not get dealt a better hand by fate this year!

Busan Ongbamrungpham and Pornpawee Chochuwong are two Thai players who are often overshadowed by May’s superstar status but I’m sure there are benefits to this. They must get to train with her at times and it’s interesting that Thailand is getting more strength in depth these days (consider the success of the juniors). Either of these two could get themselves a podium place but the prize on offer will be more than that. Both are still fighting for an Olympic spot, but both cannot go because of Ratchanok. Chochuwong is slightly behind her compatriot in the rankings so I think she needs to do well here. Saina needs to watch out because either of these two could trample on her ambitions to fulfil their own.

Conclusion

The BWF ranking list that’s due to be published at the end of April will confirm which players make Tokyo and who stays home. Some athletes are on a knife edge now; they have to seize the moment. The absence of many of the Chinese players gives an unlooked-for advantage to the competitors in this tournament. If we consider Marin, her side of the draw looks reasonably trouble-free; she should be able to pocket this home tournament. The interesting question is, can Saina rise to the challenge?

Screenshot from BWF TV

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

If you’re a Saina fan take a look at this https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/10/08/indias-saina-nehwal-trailblazer-legend/

CHEN Qing Chen & JIA Yi Fan

Chinese players were the dominant force of the 2019 All England Championships: of the five titles up for grabs they won three.  The current holders of the Women’s Doubles trophy, CHEN Qing Chen and JIA Yi Fan will be in an upbeat mood as they analyse the year they had – altogether six tournament victories – and optimistic about meeting the challenges ahead. 

From BWF TV

Women’s Doubles is contested by lots of talented twosomes from all over the badminton playing world but it’s interesting to note that there is no Momota-like presence who rules supreme.  Consider the five Super750 tournaments from last year, remarkably they were each won by different pairs.  However, CHEN & JIA have the competitive edge when we look at the most coveted trophies on the tour, the Super1000.  They are able to inject a bit of extra sparkle under pressure and this enabled them to win two of the 3 – the YAE & the China Open – and bronze in the third.  This trio of elite competitions are the ones that all players want to win, so to bag two in a year is a mark of superiority and it illustrates their enjoyment of performing on the big stage in front of a large crowd.

What is it about this partnership that makes them thrive at the highest level?  They have been playing together for years and so the crucial foundation of rotation and mutual support has become effortless.  The flow of movement is very smooth, this underpins their attacks and lets them pummel opponents into defeat.  Crucially they both have reliable serves (the most important shot in the game in my opinion) so unlike some of their rivals they can expect to gain control of the rally right from the start.  And, of course, they have the expertise of the Chinese coaches to support them at every match.

Embed from Getty Images

CHEN is a pressure player, always busy with energy and focus.  Good technique means she can generate a lot of power despite her lack of height (164cm).  Her superb cross-court smashes are unleashed with ferocity and accuracy to gain a lot of points for the team.  At the start of her senior career she competed in Mixed and Women’s Doubles and has enjoyed success in both.  Nowadays she concentrates more on WD but playing against men has informed her style.  She’s brave, resolute and will face down aggression easily.  She provoked headlines at the YAE last year when she cut short her celebrations, trimmed her lap of honour and avoided the spotlights.  She explained later that she wanted a low profile so as not to distract her friend CHEN Yufei, who was about to enter the arena to play her Women’s Singles final.  This shows a good mark of respect for her teammates and a lack of ego.

Embed from Getty Images

It’s often said – most notably by the great Morten Frost – that JIA Yi Fan is the key to this partnership’s success.  If she is playing to her potential then they tend to win.  She is left-handed and like CHEN can produce a lot of power.  She is a decisive player who will smash, follow-up and then bury the shuttle to clinch a point.  Her flat drives build pressure to force mistakes especially when she puts them together in her attacking sequences. She has a delicate touch at the net too, and can take the sting out of a speeding shuttle to wrongfoot opponents.

As a pair they play at a high tempo and with venom.  I watched their semi-final and final in Birmingham last year and was stunned by their hostile bombardment of their opponents.  The experience of seeing them play live was memorable because the speed and accuracy they can produce is overwhelming.  They can be unceasingly intense and often opponents get pinned down midcourt as flat vicious drives and smashes zero in on them.  I always think that the attacking combination of a lefty with a conventional right-hander is a mix guaranteed to unsettle rivals.  They have to unpick their muscle memory to modify the standard defence routines so a proportion of their automatic responses to pressure are obsolete.

Can they retain their title in Birmingham?  They’ve begun the year in anticlimactic fashion at the Malaysian Masters but I don’t think we should read anything major into that result. As we know, 2020 is Olympic year which is significant to the focus of athletes’ training cycles. The danger from the Japanese WD pairs is huge. There are lots of players who are going to be pushing to the limit because qualification for Tokyo is restricted to two WD pairs per country.  Fukushima and Hirota, Matsumoto and Nagahara, not to mention the current Olympic Champions Matsutomo and Takahashi all need success in England.

So, there are threats to CHEN & JIA’s desire to make it two in a row in Birmingham but not many players who have the firepower that they can bring to a match.  The pace and power they unleash is breath-taking. Momentum in sport is so important and any athlete with ambitions to win in March will need to bring their best game to the All England.  On the big stage, in the important competitions is where this Chinese pair shine and there is no better tournament for them to cement their legend.


This first appeared on the Yonex All England website https://www.allenglandbadminton.com/news/chen-qing-chen-jia-yi-fan-in-depth/

If you enjoyed this you may like my article about one of their biggest rivals, Fukuhiro https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/11/06/japans-fukuhiro-can-they-win-tokyo-gold/

Or this one about Polii & Rahayu https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/01/19/greysap-redux-polii-rahayu-are-back/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

The Adcocks

The most prestigious badminton tournament in the world has been missing something since 2005: an English winner of a final.  The All England title is the Special One, the one that every elite player covets – in Mixed Doubles can Gabby and Chris Adcock make it to the podium in 2020 and confirm their place amongst the legends of the sport?

Screenshot from BWF TV.

Through the years this sector has seen some iconic winners, not least the hattrick of victories by the Indonesian pair Lilyana Natsir and Tontowi Ahmad between 2012-2014, however we have to go back to 2005 to find the last English triumph.  Gail Emms and Nathan Robertson’s 3 set win over the Danish duo of Thomas Laybourn and Kamilla Rytter Juhl was a red-letter day for home fans.  They were a tough couple who just refused to be beaten on their native soil.  They narrowly failed to defend their title the following year, and in 2007 Anthony Clark and Donna Kellogg got to the final but came away with the silver medal.  So now we look to the Adcocks to see if they can seize the chance to get Gold in Birmingham.

Gabby and Chris are a partnership that was always meant to be.  As children they used to play badminton together, but as they got older, they were paired up with other people.  The London 2012 Olympics came and went with not too much to remark upon. However, when they rekindled their partnership on and off court a sequence of competitive success began.  They married in 2013 and one of their first major titles was Commonwealth Gold in 2014, successfully retained in 2018. Amongst their other achievements have been Gold at the BWF Superseries season ending event in Dubai 2015 (the only Brits before or since) and World Championship bronze in 2017, not to mention the 2017/2018 European titles.

Embed from Getty Images

Gabby Adcock is a great XD partner.  It’s noticeable that in the last couple of decades our expectations of a woman’s role in XD have evolved.  There is more equality of responsibility and although traditional positions and movement are still fundamental there is a new flexibility in approach; Natsir has been a very progressive influence on this. Gabby has the ability to perform well within this tactical framework and in an evenly balanced game the woman player’s skills will have a big impact. It should go without saying that she is a great player at the net, with sharp kills she brings a fearless intensity to the position.  As she is mostly playing at the front she is always alert to strategic possibilities.  It’s crucial that she will make interceptions, her fast feet and good spatial awareness help her to control the tempo of the game and this can be a valuable platform for Chris’s aggression.  The ferocity in the team does not just come from him though; she has a great smash and the strength to repel attack if she finds herself in the rear court.

Chris Adcock is one of the best XD men players in the world.  He likes to maintain the offensive focus and is skilful at supporting Gabby’s position.  He likes to compress the space by moving forward a little in midcourt to keep the pressure on the opposition; it means that gaps for rivals to score in are harder to find. He has a powerful smash so any attempt to hit over him has to be very accurate.   He has been a successful MD player in the early years of his career and this has given him plenty of confidence to step up to the net if necessary, he’ll execute nice blocks with flat pushes over the net and he’s good at finding openings to exploit.  They work well together to engineer winning chances. 2019 in review has to go down as a patchy year; uneven results stemmed from persistent injury niggles including very painful toe joint problems for Gabby.  Their best ever world ranking – #4 – came in 2017.  Now, two years later they have slipped out of the top 10.  The consequences of injuries are broad because they disrupt both partners training programmes as well as tournament performance.  The value of ranking positions is that it affects whether athletes are seeded for competitions, if they are unseeded it means that they will probably have to play strong pairs early on.   

2020 has some wonderful opportunities on the horizon for this duo.  Once again, they are playing in the Indian PBL with the Pune Aces. There are undoubted benefits to a fresh approach, new training partners and a lively fan base. Take a look at this quote from Chris

“The biggest thing to happen this year is to have a quality player like Hendra Setiawan in your team. You can train with him, you can learn from him. We (he and his wife and mixed doubles partner Gabrielle) are obviously very experienced players but Hendra is obviously in a different world and amazing to watch,”

Adcock, England!
Screenshot from BWF TV

In the past there have been some nerve tingling games in Birmingham involving the Adcocks.  After losing in the semi-final in 2016, the following year they found themselves playing for a shot at the title again against LIU Kai and HUANG Yaqiong from China.  They each won a set, and Chris served for the match in the third with the score at 20-19. This was the moment that he has described as “the worst string break of all time”.  In that instant the game turned as they lost the next points, the third set and the match.  It was an excruciating slice of bad luck. 

So, in March, will we see English representatives in the XD final?  There’s no doubt that Chris and Gabby have the skills and drive to do well.  I’d love to see them begin 2020 injury-free so that they can start building their competitive momentum for success at the Yonex All England; earning back their status as seeds with some good results is the first step.  The whole of the English badminton community – from village hall players to the elite – would enjoy watching them triumph in Birmingham.  If they win here, they will reinforce their status as England’s #1 XD pair and become legends in the game for all time.


A version of this post first appeared on the Yonex All England website https://www.allenglandbadminton.com/media/


If you enjoyed this then click the link to read about another England legend, Lauren Smith https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/08/09/lauren-smith-doubles-for-britain/ or this one about TAI Tzu Ying https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/12/16/tai-tzu-ying-the-queen/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

January – Top Takeaways for Women’s Badminton.

A new year with old rivalries and the added piquancy of the Olympics in July. We are six months away from the biggest athletic event on the planet, the intensity and desire for success is going to build with each tournament and this all adds up to a scintillating few months in prospect for fans. The anticipation of qualification is offset by the dread of failure. 2020 has started with some thrilling matches; finals day at Istora was a cauldron of raw emotion – who didn’t relish those results with utter joy? What have we learned in January, who is up for the fight? Who has that podium in Tokyo in their sights?

Women’s Singles

TAI Tzu Ying has been treading a different path to her rivals this year. She is cherry-picking the best tournaments to support her ambition. This feels like an athlete with a plan and along with her coaches she understands that entering every tournament is not the effective way for her to achieve her goal. Getting the balance right between training, competition and fitness is what coaches are paid to do. I think it’s been a stroke of genius to play in the PBL. It has freshened up the daily grind, there are some excellent training partners for her and she gets to play matches that are important but it’s not a catastrophy to lose. For instance, only 16 years old but Gayatri Gopichand took a set off TTY in the PBL whilst playing for Chennai Superstarz – now here is a girl with ambition!

From BWF TV

As ever, this is the most dynamic, exciting sector of badminton with the best athletes. Head-to-head battles between the top 20 players are often gloriously unpredictable. In contrast to the men’s game there is no dominant player except that CHEN Yufei won 7 tournaments in 2019 and significantly she does not lose finals. As current World #1 she started 2020 in good form and won the Malaysia Masters by beating TAI Tzu Ying in two sets. Crucially she hasn’t built upon this opportunity to dominate; she was knocked out of the Indonesian Masters on the second day by the unseeded Line Kjaersfeldt.

Carolina Marin has been cultivating her old aura of unbeatability and has been on the podium at all three competitions this year. Reliable results should be a good indicator of future success so we have to acknowledge that she is the person in January who has delivered. Nevertheless, no titles yet and she has been beaten by three different players: CYF, May & Akane, so this tells me that she still has loads of work to do if she wants to defend her 2016 Gold medal.

Akane & Nozomi: no-one can be under greater pressure to do well in Japan than the two home players. January has been a good month for Akane. Her win over AN Se Young in the Thailand Masters final is perhaps a sign that she is emerging from a hard few months of injury disruption. Nozomi has had a quiet start to the year after a successful and frustrating 2019. Five finals, five runners up medals. There were times last year when she was modifying her game to incorporate more aggression, she has to be less predictable to just get that extra 1% that makes the difference between Silver and Gold.

Indian Badminton

Indian Badminton does seem to be going through a bit of a rough patch at the moment, last year was pretty uneven and not much has improved. Saina Nehwal is a true great of the game but results are not good enough at the moment to ensure her qualification for Tokyo. Only a fool would write off her chances at this point and on a positive note her triumph over AN Se Young in R2 of The Malaysia Masters was a reminder that she can beat anyone. I’m unconvinced that her current coaching setup adds to her competitive edge though; I think that if her fluency improves and strategies to get her qualification points whereever she can are used then we still may see her in Japan. Her withdrawal from the Badminton Asia Team Championships plus her recent political work point to a lack of focus. As an observer I just see chaos.

P V Sindhu has a reputation as a ‘Big Tournament Player’ and is the current world champion. Nevertheless, her tendency to crash out of tournaments too early is frustrating. We often excuse her underperformance because we see her respond well to the biggest challenges. I am sympathetic to this view but surely it’s better to win and get some competitive momentum rather than travel here, there and everywhere only to crash out early? Nevermind, emotions aside, I don’t think her results over the past six months are much worse than Akanes so perhaps it’s better to just enjoy the rollercoaster. Of course she will get to Tokyo, but will she get on the podium? On the strength of January’s performances I am sceptical.

Women’s Doubles

My highlight in January across all sectors has to be Polii & Rahayu’s victory at the Indonesia Masters. Their semi-final and final were emotionally exhausting epics. It’s taken a lot of courage for them to analyse and rebuild their game. Over the next few months I hope we see this revitalised pair win more. No Japanese duo has made a final yet this year and it’s still not decided which of them will be competing in Tokyo. This must be a difficult situation because they need to compete well to get ranking points to increase their chances of qualification however over-training and too much competition could risk injury or burn out. CHEN/JIA are very dangerous players, so strong and such brutal attackers but they are not dominating tournaments yet. It’s a very fluid picture; there is an opportunity in this sector for a pair to really boss the results – who will step up?

Any Conclusions?

Winning an Olympic Gold is never a fluke but rather the result of years and years of dedication. Carolina’s consistency in the routine of competition is the opposite of what we observe from P V Sindhu and yet judging by January’s results both of them risk being denied medals. TTY looks focused and although we know she can be perfectly imperfect, at the moment the logic of her regime seems sound. I’ve barely mentioned May or AN Se Young. Ratchanok had an excellent win over Marin in the final of the Indonesian Masters and no worries about her stamina in that 3 set match. ASY is still work in progress, but she is transtioning from Giant-killer to Giant. I wonder if this will be achieved by July?

There’s still a long way to go, a lot of matches to be played. The first milestone is the end of the qualifying period on the 26th April. Nerves are jangling a little already, once we have the final list of players the anticipation and dread can really begin.


I need to acknowledge the incredibly sad road traffic accident in Malaysia and offer sincere condolences to the family of the deceased driver, Mr N Bavan. I also send sympathy to everyone affected by this. We should appreciate the good things in our lives everyday. As Dato Lee Chong Wei said in his Chinese New Year Message …”time to put down everything, shut down the computer…go back home. There is someone there thinking for you. Always remember to treat it as the last new year you would ever have. Cherish your love one.”


If you enjoyed this article follow the link for my recent piece about Polii & Rahayu https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/01/19/greysap-redux-polii-rahayu-are-back/ or this one about AN Se Young https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/07/08/an-se-young-koreas-sensational-17-year-old/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Lee Chong Wei – Hero of a Nation

In 2018. Screen shot from BWF TV

Datuk Lee Chong Wei, for anyone in the Badminton world, this man needs no introduction. For nearly two decades Lee Chong Wei flew the flag for Malaysia in mens singles. Hailed by many as a hero for Malaysia his perseverance and willingness to never give up has inspired all.

Dazzling footwork, blinding speed and aggressive power

We can’t talk about Lee Chong Wei without discussing his two most defining aspects, his speed and power. He’s easily one of the fastest players there has ever been. He makes even the most difficult footwork look easy. He glides around the court, never missing a beat. Leading the rallies by setting the pace, other players are just playing catchup most of the time.

His speed is beautifully coupled by his raw physical power. Capable of hitting smashes way over the 380kmph consistently and even seeing smashes reaching 400kmph and above keeps his opponents in check. His straight smash from round the head on his backhand side is one of the most lethal shots I’ve ever seen if the opponent can somehow get it back he’s ready to follow up and kill the reply.

All of this combined gave the Malaysian a distinct playing style that very few could ever combat and even fewer have been able to emulate. There’s something mesmerising watching him covering the court with ease and then suddenly explode and start piling pressure onto his opponent. It’s exciting, to say the least.

Olympic glory, accolades and knighthood

3 Olympic silver medals, 3 World Championship medals, 46 Super Series title and more than 700 career wins! Lee Chong Wei’s trophy cabinet makes him one of the most decorated in not just in Badminton but in sport in general.

Sadly he never attained the two most coveted titles in Badminton, gold in the Olympics and the World Championships. How massive even these silver medals are for Malaysia that he was granted the title of Datuk, akin to a knighthood for Malaysians.

None could amount to his sheer dominance at his home event, the Malaysia Open! He won it a total 12 times with eight of them year on year. A record unprecedented by any other. He was untouchable on home soil, fueled by the roaring fans he lacked no confidence in any encounter.

One of the Four Kings in Badminton mens singles and a part of the Yonex Legends Vision team he’s cemented himself as one of the greats of the sport. His Badminton academy aims to deliver world-class coaching, mentoring and opportunities to the next generation of players who look up to and idolise him.

Badminton’s greatest rivalry

We can’t talk about Lee Chong Wei without talking about his biggest rival, Lin Dan. Their rivalry is one of Badminton’s greatest if not the greatest. In their prime, nobody came close to either of them. Titles were decided by the two of them and the two of them alone.

They met each other 40 times throughout their careers. Their matches were titanic clashes of speed, power and finesse. They met in the Olympic final twice in a row and Lee Chong Wei lost out in both of their meetings in 2008 and 2012. Finally, he managed to break the cycle by defeating Lin Dan in the semi-final of Rio 2016 in one of the most nail-biting matches ever.

They battled at the All England, the World Championships and countless other events throughout the years. Badminton was lucky enough to see these two greats bring out the best in each other. Lee Chong Wei was on the wrong side of a 28-12 head-to-head with Lin Dan but without those loses he wouldn’t be the incredible champion he is. Each loss inspired the next ascent to even higher greatness.

Hero of the Badminton world

Despite his setbacks, despite his loses, despite everything he had gone through he continued to fight on. His ability to keep on getting up and to press forward gave everyone else hope. They hoped they could be like him, to come back stronger and better than before.

Sadly, June 2019 saw his career come to end. Despite fighting back against nose cancer he was unable to return to competitive play. The world of Badminton wept for a man who could have gone even further even at the age of 36 he was still one of the best in the world.

A Badminton legend but also a wonderful person. Players and fans always met by his welcoming and friendly smile he was loved as a person as much as a player. Respected not just for what he achieved but how it never changed him, how showed everyone how to win and how to lose, with pride, decency and respect.

He taught us how to keep on fighting. How to get back up after a fall. His story inspired millions. He inspired the world, he definitely inspired me.

This article was written by Liam Walsh of BadmintonsBest. A Badminton blog inspiring more people to pick up Badminton and reach their full potential. 


If you enjoyed this you may like the following article about the current world #1 Kento Momota https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/12/27/kento-momota/ or this one about one of his most exciting rivals: Anthony Ginting https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/11/25/anthony-sinisuka-ginting/


Greysap Redux: Polii & Rahayu Are Back

“…we still have a lot of work on ahead of the Olympics…” Greysia Polli

Greysap’s victory in the Women’s Doubles final at the Indonesia Masters was sensational. In an emotionally charged Istora the home crowd roared the fight to it’s climax. Fruergaard & Thygesen held match point at 20-19 after three punishing sets. Polii and Rahayu refused to give in. Again the Danes held match point at 21-20 but for a second time they would not concede. The Indonesians suddenly found some last bursts of desire and determination and sealed the win 23-21.

Celebrating the win. Screenshot BWF TV

2020 has begun well for Greysia Polii and Apriana Rahayu but there were times in 2019 when it seemed as though the partnership had run it’s course. In the first half of the year they won the India Open but they failed to build on this and did not seem to be able to dictate the course of their matches . Results were flat and there was a worry that they were using tactics that would never get them to the top of the podium. There was a palpable feeling of stagnation about their strategy and style.

At this moment we all wanted to hug them!

In August in Basle they won bronze at the BWF world championships. The QF match was a difficult tussle against CHEN & JIA who bombarded them with shuttles hit with alarming venom. It was hard to see how they would survive this gruelling game but they rejected easy options and stood their ground, eventually winning 25-23 23-21. In hindsight this tournament was a turning point. I think that because of Polii’s subsequent injury issues they had to have an honest conversation with themselves and their coaches about their future. In the past they often seemed happy ‘just’ to defend in matches but this was adding to their competitive decline. Other pairs had worked them out and a game based around long rallies, clears and defence was not enough.

Greysap’s participation in the SEA Games was odd. At the time other key Indonesian players were preparing for the World Tour Finals. However, in Manila they won Gold. Greysia Polii already held three silvers from this event with two other partners (Jo Novita & Nitya Krishinda Maheswari) but this time, with Apri Rahayu she finally got the Gold. Reports coming out of the Philippines were positive. But straight after the tournament ended they had to jump on a plane to China. They arrived in Guangzhou late, missed the Gala dinner, then never really got going at the round robin stage. They didn’t progess after losing every game. Greysap fans everywhere went into the break feeling confused. Was the SEA Games victory an anomaly?

These two are always smiling at each other and mutually supportive. Screenshot BWF TV

The first tournament of the year – The Malaysia Masters 2020 – saw them lose in the semi final to the eventual winners. There were reasons to be cheerful. And so we come to their ‘home’ tournament: The Indonesia Masters. We all know what happened next, but I want to look at how it happened because I think we have witnessed them transforming into a much sharper, more effective team.

The key to this change has been Apri. She has always been brave, aggressive, and works hard for the team. Now she has discovered something extra.

Recently Apri has been playing some XD with Tontowi Ahmad. It is a cliche in badminton that women who play XD often improve their confidence at the net for WD but I think this has happened. It must also be fantastic for her self belief that a legend like Tontowi wants to play with her. She has a focused hunger in the forecourt now. There is a drive to go and hunt for points and we are seeing great interceptions. This in alliance with the short flat rallies she can initiate with Greysia in support put immense pressure on opponents.

Their flat game has a great tempo and the sequences they can build from this put them at a competitive advantage. Both of them can execute steep smashes and they are relentless. They still have the stamina and appetite for long rallies but now Apri has improved her spatial awareness. She will change the direction of the shuttle in a rally to exploit space. Her appetite for winning the points has sharpened. Of course they are still great defenders and getting winners out of defence is a very powerful way of dominating an opponent.

The Indonesia Masters is done. There is a bigger goal that we are all starting to look at. The Tokyo Olympics is looming. The commentators are all looking at their rivals as favourites for a medal. The strength in depth of the Japanese WD pairs is such that we wonder which of them will miss out in the qualification process; CHEN & JIA are another two challengers who must believe they have a great chance of success.

I would love Greysia Polii and Apriyana Rahayu to be there in the medals, and why not? Here are two players who are so committed to their dream that they have had the courage to reshape their game. The key point is that they have changed; this makes them less predictable and therefore more dangerous. On court they are always mutually supportive, always smiling at each other, it’s obvious they have the temperament to hold their nerve when others crack. Greysia has so much experience of the elite competitions, she knows what is required and she has realised that this is it – no second chances for her now, retirement threatens. I hope we see them on that podium, I hope they stay fit, keep developing and do themselves justice. Go girls!


The moment of victory. Screenshot from BWF tv

This is a link to a blog I wrote about them around a year ago https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/04/12/a-thriving-partnership-indonesias-polii-and-rahayu/

If you enjoyed this then take a look at my article about the Minions https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/11/29/the-minions-indonesian-superheroes/ or this one about one of Greysap’s main rivals Fukuhiro https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/11/06/japans-fukuhiro-can-they-win-tokyo-gold/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Susy Susanti: Inspirational Icon

By Ferdinan Utama

Barcelona!

That will be the first answer if you question any badminton lovers or any Indonesian about Susy Susanti. Understandable because she was the first Olympic Gold medalist from Indonesia: that victory in Spain gave the nation joy, pride and put Indonesia’s name on the list of elite countries who have an Olympic gold medal. It made the world take notice of Indonesian badminton.

The iconic moment at the medal ceremony in Barcelona.
Screenshot from Swiss TV via YouTube

Whilst the Olympic success is surely her biggest, most famous achievement, she also excelled in the other major tournaments. She burst onto the international stage when she stormed to the final of the All England at the age of 18. Her opponent was LI Lingwei – one of the best women singles of all time – on that occasion she was beaten but she turned defeat into fuel for future triumph.

England became a happy hunting ground for Susy.  Over an extraordinary five years she won the All England title 4 times; this included the last time at Wembley and the first in Birmingham. Ironically, the one she didn’t win is in the year when she won the Olympic gold.  This is more a reflection of the Chinese strength in Women’s Singles at the time rather than any deficiency on her part. In 1993 her successes in England continued when she collected the IBF World Championship Gold; the final in Birmingham was over 3 sets when she beat Bang Soo-hyun of Korea.

Although she is a Women’s Singles player, her understanding of what it means to be part of a team is exemplary.  Her commitment to Indonesian badminton has been unwavering down the years.  A great example of this is the role she has played in her country’s Uber Cup success. By the start of the 1994 competition China was the ruler of women’s team badminton: they had won the previous five editions of the bi-annual event. Indonesia’s last appearance in the final had been in 1986.  The stage was set for something extraordinary.  Whilst the Istora crowd roared, Susi won all her matches.  Buoyed by the first victory, Lili Tampi and Finarsih doubled the team lead before China’s strength in depth showed and they forced it to a decider.  That’s when two future legends squared up for the first time.  The then not yet fifteen Mia Audina beat ZHANG Ning to win the cup on home soil.  Two years later they repeated the feat in Hong Kong to retain the trophy.

Embed from Getty Images

For me, Susy is like a lionness around the badminton court.  Her cold, intimidating stare helped to unnerve her rival across the net as she served. She favoured long rallies, and her attritional style was supported by her stamina which meant she was fit enough to cover every inch of the court through her game.  She fed off opponent’s mistakes and fatigue.  She is known for her athleticism and flexibility; like a gymnast she would get low to take shots at the limit of her reach by an extreme lunge which was more like the splits.

In Atlanta she won her second Olympic medal then finally retired in 98 after the Asian Games citing pregnancy as the main reason. She was off court but could not leave badminton entirely.  Along with her husband Alan Budikusuma she established a racket company called ASTEC. She remain off court and out of the camera’s bright lights until 2008 when destiny called.The Indonesia Uber Cup team was at its lowest. They did not qualify for the 2006 competition in Japan after finishing outside of the top 4 in the qualifying round two years earlier. They only qualified to participate in 2008 because it was being hosted in Jakarta. The published target at that time was just to advance from the group, but that team was headed by Susy as manager.  With her encouragement they achieved much more than that. Not only did they advance from the group stage but they charged into the final with a never say die performance.  Badminton popularity in Indonesia, which has been dimmed since the turn of millenia, suddenly rekindled. So many people were motivated by this feat to start to play or follow badminton again.  We can still see the influence now after that final. I think the current crop of Indonesian young players is partly the result of her impact.

Susy is still the only women’s singles player to hold the All England, the Olympic and the World Championship simultaneously.    She is still the only Indonesia player that has won all the major team and individual events and that includes the Sudirman Cup.  Her achievements mean she is one of the greatest players of all time, a true inspiration to badminton players and fans everywhere.


Follow the link to this article about Polii & Rahayu https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/04/12/a-thriving-partnership-indonesias-polii-and-rahayu/ or this one about Marcus & Kevin https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/11/29/the-minions-indonesian-superheroes/

Perodua Malaysia Masters 2020

There’s something extra spicy about tournaments this close to the Tokyo Olympics.

Womens Singles Preview

For me, this is the most exhilarating sector in world badminton; the calibre of the athletes outside the top seeds means that shocks and early exits are standard fare.

AN Se Young – Seeded 8
AN Se Young – Screenshot from BWF TV

What a breathtaking year 2019 was for this young player: the stand-out result had to be her victory in the final of the French Open against Marin in three sets, but there were plenty of other wins along the way. She’s a great retriever, patient and happy to keep the shuttle in play but there is also a depth of skill to her game at the net which makes it hard for a rival to intimidate her. We shouldn’t think of her as a giantkiller…she is becoming the giant! Prediction: Final

!!UPDATE. AN Se Young crashes out to Saina in R2 to set up a Clash of the Titans with Carolina Marin in the quarter final. What a performance from Saina. The 29 year old beat ASY in straight sets 25-23 21-12. I think this means that her dream of qualifying for Tokyo is still alive. Bravo Saina.

TAI Tzu Ying – Seeded 1

Every badminton fan aches to see TTY in a final. Her sensational skills are a non-stop source of wonder and joy. It’s clear that Coach LAI and her team have the podium in Tokyo as the focus for the year; each of these tournaments form a percentage of her preparation for that. Ultimately beautiful shots – in isolation – will not be enough and I think we are starting to see a realisation that cutting out mistakes and halting the drift of games when she loses momentum are key. Prediction: Final

Akane Yamaguchi – Seeded 4, and Carolina Marin – unseeded

Akane has a nightmarish R1 draw lined up against the unseeded (!) Carolina Marin. She had such a patchy end to 2019 that it’s impossible to say how this encounter will go. Carolina is back and she is hungry.

CHEN Yufei – Seeded 2

Although a lot of attention has been paid to Momota for his supremacy in the men’s singles last year, I think CHEN Yufei’s acheivements have been equal if not better. Arguably she is in a more competitive sector with more variations of style to cope with. She finished the year as World #1, seven titles and she was a member of the triumphant Chinese Sudirman Cup team. She is strategically mature, able to sit and wait or be more agressive depending on her opponent. Prediction: Final

Ratchanok Intanon – Seeded 5

May has won this title for two years in a row and is always a brave player in tight situations. This can be a high risk strategy although I love her for it. A gritty ‘death or glory’ approach means that she is vulnerable to patient players like CHEN Yufei who know that keeping the shuttle in play will eventually lead to an opportunity to score. Prediction: QF

Nozomi Okuhara – Seeded 3

Towards the end of last year I thought Nozomi was introducing more attacking play to her game. She is known as a patient retriever, and that style has been getting her to tournament finals but the issue is that she hasn’t been winning them. She has to alter the balance of her game somehow to give herself a tactical edge. Prediction: Semi Final

Gregoria,Saina,Sindhu,HE

Any one of these four could find themselves in the semi-final but they all need to find some extra sparkle from somewhere. The last twelve months have contained frustration, injury, bad-luck and poor form. What to say about Sindhu? The too-brief period with coach KIM brought a new focus and better technique; a pressure game that crushed all her opponents at the World Championships. Where has that player gone? If she rediscovers that badminton beast she can be unstoppable. Saina has also suffered through a very uneven year with a lot of disruption because of injury and, it seems to me, lack of continuity around her coaching support. Of all the top players she is the one who is in serious danger of missing qualification for the Olympics if she doesn’t turn things around soon. She has the prospect of a R2 against AN Se Young which is going to put her fitness and resolve under heavy scrutiny. Tunjung is a delightful player who just seems to find it difficult to build a momentum of good results. Her R1 game is against May which means that progress is going to be tough but not impossible. HE is consistently a top 8 seeded player without many titles to show for it and I don’t really see that changing anytime soon.

Men’s Singles

Eleven titles for Momota in 2019 and who is going to stop him dominating the Men’s sector this year as well? Technically, strategically and physically he is ahead of his rivals and we know that in the sporting arena athletes are able to remodel their game to give themselves a new edge Recently Yosuke Nakanishi (his coach) has been reported as saying that SHI Yuqi is his biggest rival. I also think that Anthony Ginting – possible quarter final opponent – and Anders Antonsen are dangerous. Within the context of this tournament it is SHI’s recovery from last year’s injury that is crucial; if he is back to full fitness the combined challenge to Momota from the other seeds as he progresses through the competition will give him a good test.

Conclusion

It’s Olympic Year and suddenly every competition seems a little more significant; not only in terms of qualification but also to read the clues as to who could be destined for Gold. Tokyo seems so near and yet there are plenty of tournaments and dramas to enjoy before that. Momota is secure at the top of his sector for now, however the contrast with the woman’s sector couldn’t be clearer. The depth of talent in the woman’s game means that no player is able to dominate. It’ll soon become clear who is starting the new year at a run; sporting momentum is important and the skill of seizing a victory then building on it is crucial. Who has the hunger to succeed?


If you enjoyed this preview here is my recent in-depth look at Momota https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/12/27/kento-momota/ and this one about AN Se Young https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/07/08/an-se-young-koreas-sensational-17-year-old/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved