Danisa Denmark Open Preview Pt2: The Men

Badminton is BACK!!!

I’m so thrilled that we all have this tournament in Odense to enjoy. It’s been too long.

Men’s Singles

I’m relishing this part of the competition. My anticipation levels are rising because of the quality of the players who have travelled to Denmark – and of course the players who are from Denmark. We all know that the Danish badminton community produces world beaters again and again; the talent that is generated from such a small nation is breath-taking.

My pick of the first round matches is the one between Christo Popov and Lakshya Sen. The left-handed Popov has been consistently successful through his junior years and in January 2020 became World Junior #1. His family are all involved in the sport in various roles: notably his father who has coached and played for the Bulgarian team plus his MD partner and brother Toma. Sen has also been catching the eye as he progresses through the worldwide junior ranks. Another player whose family are immersed in badminton, he is part of a new generation of Indian shuttlers. It’s well-known that he benefitted from Morten Frost’s expertise in 2019 when the Danish star coached for a while at the Prakash Padukone academy. This game will showcase two of the brightest stars that are progressing into the senior game. It’s hard to predict how far the winner can advance but I suspect that stamina may become an issue as the week progresses: maintaining a high level of play day after day will be tough, especially after 7 months away.

Picture from CTC Instagram – no picture credit.

CHOU Tien Chen is the de facto top seed in the absence of Momota but he is going to have to battle hard if he wants this title. He was comprehensively dismantled by Axelsen in the final of the YAE back in March but he has had plenty of time since to absorb the lessons of that day. I watched that game live and I felt that he seemed unfocused through a lot of the match, his range was off and so he was never really able to get any sort of competitive momentum. He is an impressive athlete, with good powerful smashes and plenty of stamina: I’d like to see him take the initiative and drive the pace of his matches forward more. Prediction: Final. I’ve seen some reports that suggest Srikanth Kidambi has been working well in training in Hyderabad. The former World #1 and previous winner of this tournament has endured a slump in form; if he progresses from the opening rounds he is seeded to meet CTC in the quarter finals so that will be a useful measure as to whether he is back to winning ways.

The last time we saw Anders Antonsen play was in his Semi-Final against CTC at the All England. The last eighteen months have seen him move up the world rankings to the extent that he is challenging Axelsen for the title of Denmark’s top player. His improvements and his ability to attack to get the upper hand will be under scrutiny here. Potentially he will meet CHOU in the semi-final: the h2h figures strongly favour the man from Taiwan. Antonsen’s ankle injury, which prematurely ended their game in Birmingham when he had to retire in the first set was a heartbreaking end to his campaign. There had been a serious possibility of an all-Danish final in that tournament. There is a chance of it happening here if he can overcome CHOU because his friend Rasmus Gemke is seeded 7 in the top half of the draw…arguably the weaker half. Gemke is a bit behind AA in the strength of his game but he still gets sweet results against top players: remember his shock victory against Ginting in March?

Aside from these there are a couple of unseeded players I’d like to mention. Hans-Kristian Vittinghus – another home player – should be eyeing the draw with a certain amount of relish. Again he is in the top half and will play the winner of Popov v Sen. In an innocence versus experience scenario I would see him getting on top. I am also a fan of Brice Leverdez after watching him play in the Indian PBL this year: lovely racket skills and nerves of steel. Moreover he too is in the top half of the draw.

Mixed Doubles

This tournament offers a huge opportunity for the English duo Lauren Smith & Marcus Ellis to bag a Super 750 title. The last time we saw them play was in their Semi Final at the All England against the eventual winners Jordan/Oktavianti. Ellis is a great competitor, an excellent partner to have on court, he never gives in and fights right to the end. The partnership with Smith is getting better and better – she’s fast, aggressive and brave. Throughout lockdown we have seen them practising at home and trying to stay focused until they could get back on court. They should be able to take to the court with a lot of confidence.

So who can put a stop to their ambition? The Adcocks are in the top half of the draw so if they can find some form they may be able to engineer an all English final. The German pair of Lamsfuss/Herttrich, or the home pair Christiansen/Boje are seeded to do well. The competition does not look likely to be controlled by any team so the athletes who can grasp every opportunity that passes could finish the week as champions.

Men’s Doubles

Unfortunately this is the sector of the competition that has been hit the hardest by the lack of Asian participation. In spite of this I think this could still be a lively contest. Olympic Bronze medalists Marcus Ellis & Chris Langridge head up a large contingent of English players in this category. The Danes Kim Astrup & Anders Rasmussen must be eyeing the title. With Astrup describing himself as a ‘caged lion’ I think there will be a load of pent-up emotion that he needs to turn to his advantage.

This has been described as a milestone week for badminton. It certainly is about time the sport returned at the highest level. I wish everyone involved a safe and successful few days. Bring it on!


If you enjoyed this take a look at my preview for the women’s sector https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/10/10/danisa-denmark-open-womens-preview/

I’ve recently been enjoying the podcasts A Year On Tour With Vittinghus – you should be able to listen to these on Spotify or other platforms.


©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

HSBC BWF World Tour Finals: Mens Preview

The season’s climax and a perfect chance to see the best of the best battle it out for glory. All year, the men’s sector has been dominated by Momota in singles and the Minions in doubles but they are not unbeatable. After countless matches in eleven months of tournaments these athletes must be feeling weary; this may be an opportunity for a title-hungry rival to spring a surprise.

Men’s Singles
Screenshot from BWF TV

Kento Momoto has been the standout player all year. Ominously, for his rivals, he seems to be winning without competing at full stretch; his patience and endurance have been key to his success. The left-hander’s control of the net and pace around the four corners mean that any potential challenger has to be prepared for a long and lonely battle in Guangzhou. However I do not think that gold is inevitable. At the same tournament last year, by his own assessment, he started in an ‘easy’ round robin group but lost in the final to SHI Yu Qi. It’s intriguing to consider how he may cope with being in a tough group; the relentless intensity on top of a hard year could push him.

Anthony Sinisuka Ginting can often be an exasperating player to support because his results are so inconsistent. This is a harsh assessment of a sportsman who I love to watch; his racket skills and speed are exceptional and this is why I consider he has underachieved in terms of gold medals this year. He was the victim of a brutal umpiring decision at the Hong Kong Open but ultimately he must seize chances when they come along. Can he get to the podium? Emphatically yes. Will he get to it? Hmmm…Jonatan Christie has been improving all year and compared to ASG seems able to maintain his concentration so he could be the more suuccessful of the two.

Anders Antonsen’s game has reached a new standard this year. His progress means he is a genuine contender in every tournament. His strength and conditioning, the accuracy of his shots, his net play – all these components of his game have been raised a notch or two. He can beat anyone in this competition. Denmark’s other representative, Viktor Axelsen, has endured an injury/allergy disrupted few months and is only just getting back to full fitness. This could give him an advantage, as he should be fresher after missing a few months of the energy sapping tour.

CHOU Tien Chen‘s standout victories this year in the finals of both the Indonesia & Thailand Open show what a tough man he is to beat. That steel should give him a small advantage in the lonely intensity of a match. His epic encounter with Momota in the final of the Fuzhou China Open (which he eventually lost) showed great strategic fluidity. Initially an attempt to match KM’s game of attrition failed so he switched to a more aggressive stance in the second set; the deciding set went Momota’s way but he was seriously troubled. It would be fantastic to see a similar blockbuster. His compatriot WANG Tzu Wei is not a player I have watched much, however he is coming into the tournament after his triumph in the Syed Modi; that will give him confidence he can ruffle some feathers in the group stage and then anything can happen.

CHEN Long’s motivation often appears a bit wobbly and many people have pointed to his 2016 Olympic Gold success as a reason. We have an athlete whose attention can be elsewhere but who can be a determined, competitive player, it is hard to predict which version will arrive in Guangzhou. Home advantage may carry him through but his focus must be 100% otherwise I don’t think he will be on the podium.

Men’s Doubles – A Brief Overview

Kevin and Marcus have been in sensational form and it would be a brave blogger who would bet against them winning this.

My only doubt is around tiredness and niggly injuries. They have played so many games this year. Kevin loves to perform when the pressure is highest, in part this gives them a small vulnerability at the beginning of tournaments, but here,on the big stage, and straight into the heat of the round robin there should be enough going on to engage his attention. The Daddies, Kamura/Sonoda, Watanabe/Endo, and LI/LIU could all pounce if they falter. Of course there is also LEE/WANG, LU/YANG, & CHIA/SOH to consider; they may make an impact but it’s going to depend on the groups – who plays who – if a pair gets a lucky break this could be a sector with a big upset. No-one is entitled to win this, however brilliant they’ve been all year.

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Yonex French Open: MS Preview

Men’s Singles is dominated by the majestic Momota; as the tour exchanges Denmark for France we can expect him to overshadow his side of the draw, but aside from him there are stacks of other athletes who could triumph at this competition if they can find consistency alongside skill. The men’s tournament will be full of explosive power, dazzling speed and brilliant shots.

Kento Momota: Unbeatable?
Screenshot from BWF tv

Will anyone ask the imperious Momota a question he cannot answer on court in Paris? This phenomenal player has brushed aside all challenges this year; it’s hard to identify any weakness. This puzzle is intriguing. Other players have better smashes, better endurance and more delicate net play but no other athlete can match his mental strength, consistency and his all round game. He is criticised for being too passive at times but it gets results so he doesn’t have to apologise for that! Often I think he plays at a constant pace (albeit fast) so it would be intriguing if a rival took a more stop/start approach to a match with him to see if it would disrupt his concentration. Prediction: Final (of course).

Antony Ginting: Seeded 8

Ginting is such a wonderful and exasperating player to follow. He’s more of an artist than the majority of the men’s players, his touch and technical skill is a joy to watch. I genuinely feel he could challenge Momota if only he could be more consistent. Crashing out in R1 of the Danish Open is simply unacceptable and yet it was unsurprising. He could meet Momota in the QF and so my prediction is QF exit, probably without his opponents sweaty shirt this time.

Viktor
Embed from Getty Images

One of the best loved players on the circuit, Viktor’s year has been disrupted by injury and his susceptibility to summer allergies. However his performance in his home town of Odense at the Denmark Open saw him returning to his best. Although he lost in the SF to CHEN Long he played well: his smashes were fast and steep, his net shots were intelligent and delicate – it was a close match. He is returning to his best form. The road to the final is a tough one at the bottom half of the draw to include CHOU Tien Chen and Anders Antonsen. Prediction Final. Maybe.

CHOU Tien Chen: The OTHER Great Player From Taiwan

Seeded 2 he has a demanding path to the final but he is a fierce and strong competitor with a great smash. When he won the Indonesian Open against Antonsen he was able to control the net and keep the pressure on without being particularly spectacular in his play. The remarkable thing was his endurance and willingness to give everything for the title. To beat the #1 seed he will have to bring a bit more to the party. Prediction SF.

Clip courtesy of the BWF
CHEN Long: The Defending Champion

CHEN Long’s struggles with motivation since winning Olympic Gold in Rio are well-documented. However, I think this is probably his only weakness. He has the might of the Chinese coaching gang behind him, and a great all-round game where he is able to control the net to force points. His victory over Viktor in Odense seemed to be because he stuck with it, kept the shuttle in play, kept body smashing and seemed able to turn the screw at the last few points of every game. It’s a simple enough strategy that proved to be effective. Prediction SF

Anders Antonsen

Antonsen’s results have been on an upward trajectory over the last few months, he’s aggressive, fast and agile around the court. He was the beaten finalist at the Indonesian Open (to CHOU Tien Chen), the World Championship Final (to Momota) and beaten semi-finalist at the Denmark Open (to Axelsen). There’s no doubt he is a rising star of the men’s game but his physical prowess can be matched by the other seeds so he has to ensure he brings something more to his matches; more strategy and deception allied to his brute power. Prediction QF

Jonatan Christie

If Indonesia is going to win titles in the singles sector then Jojo should be a player who steps up alongside Ginting. Just like Ginting his form ebbs and flows to frustrate his millions of supporters. He’s capable of beating any player in the top ten – including Momota – he needs to exploit his emotions and focus the passion to benefit his superb skills. He could face a double Dane onslaught with possible Antonsen QF and then Axelsen SF: it’s a lot to ask for him to reach the final of this one. Prediction SF.

In Conclusion

Often I seen MS in terms of who, if anyone, is going to upset Momota? Realistically it’s hard to see beyond him. Shi Yuqi is expected to be absent owing to his continued recuperation from ankle injury. If only Ginting or Christie could borrow some of the Minions reliable form then the men’s side of singles could be as open and unpredictable as the womens game. As it is, Momota is in magnificent form, no one is able to unsettle his composure. It looks like this is another tournament waiting for him to win.


here is my recent article about The Queen: Tai Tzu Ying https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/07/01/tai-tzu-ying-goddess-or-mortal/

and this one about Nozomi https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2019/04/23/nozomi-okuhara-racket-ready-for-tokyo-glory/

©2020 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved