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Badminton,Team GB and Tokyo

The British have chosen 11 players to challenge for medals at the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics but they are not necessarily the athletes we expected to be on the list at the start of June. In an astonishingly brutal decision the Rio bronze medallists – Marcus Ellis and Chris Langridge – were dropped in favour of the young guns: Ben Lane and Sean Vendy. Of course, we know that regardless of qualifying via BWF ranking points the final gift of a place is decided by the coaches but it appears to be a decision that was communicated at the eleventh hour. This probably means it’s too late for any sort of meaningful appeal. As an observer I have no inside knowledge but Langridge’s instagram post from June 4th suggests he thought he was part of the team.

Official Logo – picture from Shutterstock

Men’s Doubles: Ben Lane & Sean Vendy

Lane and Vendy were excellent in Thailand in January. They thrived in the bubble and I really feel that their level of performance went up by several notches. The challenge for them now is to maintain that improvement with an eye on the future. Their pathway leads to the Paris Olympics and if they are going to disrupt the stranglehold that Indonesia, Japan and China have on this sector then the hard work is only just beginning. Tokyo offers vital experience and they must use it to enrich their future matches.

Mixed Doubles: Lauren Smith & Marcus Ellis

These two can go toe-to-toe with the best and I’m very excited about their chances for a medal. Ellis is a fantastic athlete: he never gives up and keeps fighting right to the end. His chippy attitude often means he seizes victory in 50/50 situations or even when defeat seems to be looming. It’s disappointing that he can’t defend his MD Bronze, however playing less games will narrow his focus and may help his load management. XD glory ultimately will stem from Lauren Smith and how she plays in the tournament. It’s vital that their strategies reflect her importance and the essential interceptions that Ellis can give at the net.

Women’s Singles: Kirsty Gilmour

This is Kirsty Gilmour’s second Olympics and it was no surprise that she qualified for the competition. Her title win at the 2020 SaarLorLux and especially her hard-fought semi-final triumph over Carolina Marin showed what a wholehearted competitor she is. She’s had a few injury niggles and training disruption but I hope she can progress through the tournament.

Men’s Singles: Toby Penty plus ParaBadminton Dan Bethell (SL3), Jack Shephard (SH6) and Krysten Coombes (SH6)

Penty will be making his Olympic debut in Tokyo so it will be interesting to see how he progresses and uses the experience to push on to – for instance – a possible medal at the Commonwealth Games next year. A lot is going to depend on the draw and his reaction to the pressure of the tournament.

Dan Bethell – who upgraded from tennis to badminton a while ago – has a genuine shot at Gold in his category (SL3) at the Parabadminton tournament. He won Silver at the World Championships in Basle 2019 and was beaten by Pramod Bhagat that day. The Indian is a superb player who has a habit of winning, so Bethell must be at his best if he wants to be on top of the podium.

Jack Shephard is an athlete who will be disappointed if he doesn’t win Gold in the SH6 class. He successfully defended his 2017 World Title in 2019 and he is the player all the others have to beat. Krysten Coombes – world #5 – is in the same sector. He won European Gold in 2016 and so knows what it takes to win high pressure games.

Women’s Doubles: Chloe Birch & Lauren Smith.

These two won silver at the European Games a couple of years ago and would be considered one of the best pairs in Europe. How far they progress is hard to predict simply because the duos from Japan, China, and Korea tend to dominate top level tournaments. A good draw and quick adjustment to local conditions could see them advance.

Men’s WH2: Martin Rooke

Rooke is a well-known competitor in both the singles and doubles of WH2. He’s one of those players who has a habit of winning so it would be no surprise to see him on the podium in Tokyo.

Can I Mention Rachel Choong?

I’m extremely disappointed that the first Paralympics to include badminton also excludes multiple world champion Rachel Choong. Her SH6 category is not included this time. Actually, it’s just the women’s SH6 that is left out, Jack Shephard and Krysten Coombes who is in the men’s SH6 will be in Tokyo. Perhaps someone can clarify the reason for this? I’m told it’s partly because when the programme for the parabadminton was announced the women’s SH6 did not have a wide global representation. Hopefully Paris 2024 will see this rectified.

Conclusions

Our Team GB athletes have four realistic chances of parabadminton medals including Gold and a chance of a further medal in the able-bodied sector. It has been a very hard year for all competitors and some nations have found it easier than others to maintain the function of a national training centre, to hold meaningful national competitions or to run Olympic Simulations.

Back in 2010 there was a magazine article http://www.theleisurereview.co.uk/articles10/christy.html that claimed Badminton England’s strategy was to be the number one badminton nation by 2016. That was a pretty taxing target but nevertheless the mission statement in 2021 still says that “Olympic success [is] at the heart of our ambitions”. The harsh truth is that success brings funding so it’s crucial that the national body can point to victories that show progress, that engage the population at large and inspire the next generation. It’s disappointing that there are no women athletes from the parabadminton community that have qualified. Of the 11 people travelling to compete only 3 are female; perhaps I can count Lauren Smith twice as she will compete in two sectors but whatever way we look at it something is not working. In terms of representing the community at large it might also be worth considering the lack of apparent diversity in the athletes backgrounds and whether this means that there is a source of talent that is not being included. I don’t know, I don’t have accurate information to hand regarding this.

The Olympics is always a hard competition to call. I hope that our athletes thrive and play their best games. It’s been a long journey to get to this point and all our players deserve their spots and the opportunity to compete against the best.


Thanks to all my friends on twitter for sharing their thoughts about the Olympics. If you enjoyed this then take a look at my recent article about the MD world Number 1s https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/06/06/kevin-marcus-and-tokyo-gold/

Olympic previews are here. Women’s Doubles https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/07/19/the-olympics-womens-doubles-preview/ Women’s Singles https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/07/17/the-olympics-womens-singles-preview/ Men’s Doubles https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/07/15/the-olympics-mens-doubles-preview/ and Mixed https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/07/14/the-olympics-mixed-doubles-preview/


©2021 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Badminton Reloaded Pt 2: Yonex Thailand Open – Doubles Preview.

Doubles highlights everything that’s brilliant about badminton. The tempo, teamwork and tactics all combine to create an electrifying show.

The Yonex Thailand Open will be our first opportunity to watch most of these pairs since March. The impact of local Covid protocols will have caused training disruption and periods when it was impossible for partners to practice together. Some athletes will have spent the last 10 months enriching their skills whilst others will have stagnated. Now there is a fresh start for everyone and I’m impatient to see who has used this time wisely.

Women’s Doubles

We have been used to the domination of the Japanese & Chinese pairs in this discipline recently so their absence is an opportunity for the other seeds – predominantly Korean and Indonesian competitors – to make a mark. Three Korean pairs are seeded: Kim/Kong (4), Lee/Shin (3) plus Chang/Kim (6) . Kim/Kong will bring a bit more to the party in terms of aggression and imaginative badminton. I wonder if the success of the Korean competitors will be determined by the performance of Apriyani Rahayu. If she can dominate the play and build off the rock-solid foundation that Greysia Polii always provides then Greyap could get to the final. The other twosome to catch the eye are the Danes: Sara Thygesen and Maiken Fruergaard. They could go far if they clear the early rounds and get into their competitive rhythm; they were outstanding at this years Indonesia Masters.

This is a link to my piece about Rahayu being the best player in the SF https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/16/apriyani-rahayu-semi-finals-player-of-the-day/

Mixed Doubles

This promises to be an exhilarating event. The #1 seeds and home favourites Puavaranukroh and Taerattanachai (that is, Bass/Popor) have a fabulous opportunity for a podium finish. Blistering speed, great technique, accuracy and aggressive style mean that they are a handful for any rival, but they are still ‘work in progress’. They were beaten in this years final of the All England over three sets by #2 seeds, Praveen Jordan and Melati Daeva Oktavianti and the prospect of a return match is a tantalising thought. When Jordan is focused and fit his ferocious smashes and cunning play form the bedrock of a formidable team; Melati’s pace and anticipation make them hard to dominate. So who could get in the way of these two pairs? Marcus Ellis and Lauren Smith are England’s best chance of a podium spot in the whole tournament. Ellis knows how to win tough games; his mental and physical resilience are superb and Smith is just getting better and better. They lost to PraMel in the All England semi final this year and would relish the chance of revenge.

Men’s Doubles

Kevin’s positive test and subsequent quarantine at home in Indonesia was a disappointment, likewise the no-show Japanese and Chinese pairs. Nevertheless, because standards are so high in this sector it is not a catastrophe for the quality of the tournament.

The brilliance and depth of talent in Indonesian badminton means that there are still 2 seeded pairs with every chance of making the final on Saturday an all-Indonesia affair. The legendary Daddies – Mohammad Ahsan and Hendra Setiawan – are superb competitors with impecable standards. Setiawan’s technical ability combined with his proactive, intelligent play means that they have the resources to claw their way to victory even when they are under the most severe pressure. Their apparently nonchalent attitude on court disguises an unshakeable winning mentality. I’m a little nervous of the Indian duo Rankireddy/Shetty who they will probably play in R2. They are young, energetic and improving all the time so this is potentially a game where the Dads need to be ready to douse any fireworks that are thrown their way. Fajar Alfian and Muhammad Rian Ardianto who are the second Indonesian seeded pair (#5) must be eyeing the podium. The English pair Marcus Ellis and Chris Langridge are unseeded but could be battling them for a place in the Semi-final.

The top half of the draw opened up with the withdrawal of the Minions. The Malaysian 8th seeds Aaron Chia and Wooi Yik Soh have emphasized in recent interviews how hard they have been training during the long lay off and that they have focused on strengthening their defensive game. This could be their chance to step up and win a major tournament. The dangermen in their way will be the Russians Ivanov/Sozonov.

After such a long break these competitions will be won by the duos with the most ambition – the trophies are there for the taking. The athletes who have been able to adapt to the covid protocols in Bangkok fast without letting it disrupt focus will enjoy a huge advantage. Thailand is the heart of badminton for January with three tournaments in a row within a safety bubble: finally, after some very hard months we can say ‘Badminton is BACK!’


Part 1 of my preview is here https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2021/01/07/badminton-reloaded-yonex-thailand-open-singles-preview/ and here is a link to an article I wrote about two of my favourite doubles players https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/01/19/greysap-redux-polii-rahayu-are-back/


©2021 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved

Danisa Denmark Open Preview Pt2: The Men

Badminton is BACK!!!

I’m so thrilled that we all have this tournament in Odense to enjoy. It’s been too long.

Men’s Singles

I’m relishing this part of the competition. My anticipation levels are rising because of the quality of the players who have travelled to Denmark – and of course the players who are from Denmark. We all know that the Danish badminton community produces world beaters again and again; the talent that is generated from such a small nation is breath-taking.

My pick of the first round matches is the one between Christo Popov and Lakshya Sen. The left-handed Popov has been consistently successful through his junior years and in January 2020 became World Junior #1. His family are all involved in the sport in various roles: notably his father who has coached and played for the Bulgarian team plus his MD partner and brother Toma. Sen has also been catching the eye as he progresses through the worldwide junior ranks. Another player whose family are immersed in badminton, he is part of a new generation of Indian shuttlers. It’s well-known that he benefitted from Morten Frost’s expertise in 2019 when the Danish star coached for a while at the Prakash Padukone academy. This game will showcase two of the brightest stars that are progressing into the senior game. It’s hard to predict how far the winner can advance but I suspect that stamina may become an issue as the week progresses: maintaining a high level of play day after day will be tough, especially after 7 months away.

CHOU Tien Chen is the de facto top seed in the absence of Momota but he is going to have to battle hard if he wants this title. He was comprehensively dismantled by Axelsen in the final of the YAE back in March but he has had plenty of time since to absorb the lessons of that day. I watched that game live and I felt that he seemed unfocused through a lot of the match, his range was off and so he was never really able to get any sort of competitive momentum. He is an impressive athlete, with good powerful smashes and plenty of stamina: I’d like to see him take the initiative and drive the pace of his matches forward more. Prediction: Final. I’ve seen some reports that suggest Srikanth Kidambi has been working well in training in Hyderabad. The former World #1 and previous winner of this tournament has endured a slump in form; if he progresses from the opening rounds he is seeded to meet CTC in the quarter finals so that will be a useful measure as to whether he is back to winning ways.

The last time we saw Anders Antonsen play was in his Semi-Final against CTC at the All England. The last eighteen months have seen him move up the world rankings to the extent that he is challenging Axelsen for the title of Denmark’s top player. His improvements and his ability to attack to get the upper hand will be under scrutiny here. Potentially he will meet CHOU in the semi-final: the h2h figures strongly favour the man from Taiwan. Antonsen’s ankle injury, which prematurely ended their game in Birmingham when he had to retire in the first set was a heartbreaking end to his campaign. There had been a serious possibility of an all-Danish final in that tournament. There is a chance of it happening here if he can overcome CHOU because his friend Rasmus Gemke is seeded 7 in the top half of the draw…arguably the weaker half. Gemke is a bit behind AA in the strength of his game but he still gets sweet results against top players: remember his shock victory against Ginting in March?

Aside from these there are a couple of unseeded players I’d like to mention. Hans-Kristian Vittinghus – another home player – should be eyeing the draw with a certain amount of relish. Again he is in the top half and will play the winner of Popov v Sen. In an innocence versus experience scenario I would see him getting on top. I am also a fan of Brice Leverdez after watching him play in the Indian PBL this year: lovely racket skills and nerves of steel. Moreover he too is in the top half of the draw.

Mixed Doubles

This tournament offers a huge opportunity for the English duo Lauren Smith & Marcus Ellis to bag a Super 750 title. The last time we saw them play was in their Semi Final at the All England against the eventual winners Jordan/Oktavianti. Ellis is a great competitor, an excellent partner to have on court, he never gives in and fights right to the end. The partnership with Smith is getting better and better – she’s fast, aggressive and brave. Throughout lockdown we have seen them practising at home and trying to stay focused until they could get back on court. They should be able to take to the court with a lot of confidence.

So who can put a stop to their ambition? The Adcocks are in the top half of the draw so if they can find some form they may be able to engineer an all English final. The German pair of Lamsfuss/Herttrich, or the home pair Christiansen/Boje are seeded to do well. The competition does not look likely to be controlled by any team so the athletes who can grasp every opportunity that passes could finish the week as champions.

Men’s Doubles

Unfortunately this is the sector of the competition that has been hit the hardest by the lack of Asian participation. In spite of this I think this could still be a lively contest. Olympic Bronze medalists Marcus Ellis & Chris Langridge head up a large contingent of English players in this category. The Danes Kim Astrup & Anders Rasmussen must be eyeing the title. With Astrup describing himself as a ‘caged lion’ I think there will be a load of pent-up emotion that he needs to turn to his advantage.

This has been described as a milestone week for badminton. It certainly is about time the sport returned at the highest level. I wish everyone involved a safe and successful few days. Bring it on!


If you enjoyed this take a look at my preview for the women’s sector https://womensbadminton.co.uk/2020/10/10/danisa-denmark-open-womens-preview/

I’ve recently been enjoying the podcasts A Year On Tour With Vittinghus – you should be able to listen to these on Spotify or other platforms.


©2021 Amanda Bloss All Rights Reserved